Buddhist writing – Gurugama http://gurugama.org/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 07:42:21 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 http://gurugama.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/favicon-16.png Buddhist writing – Gurugama http://gurugama.org/ 32 32 Interview with Tenzin Choegyal and more http://gurugama.org/interview-with-tenzin-choegyal-and-more/ Sat, 18 Jun 2022 10:25:09 +0000 http://gurugama.org/interview-with-tenzin-choegyal-and-more/ Nothing is permanent, everything is precious. Here is a selection of some events – ephemeral or not – at Tricycle and in the Buddhist world this week Last Month’s Haiku Challenge Winners The winning poets of May’s haiku contest have all addressed the most remarkable feature of a soap bubble: the fleeting and unstable beauty […]]]>

Nothing is permanent, everything is precious. Here is a selection of some events – ephemeral or not – at Tricycle and in the Buddhist world this week

Last Month’s Haiku Challenge Winners

The winning poets of May’s haiku contest have all addressed the most remarkable feature of a soap bubble: the fleeting and unstable beauty of its “small world.” Read it haiku winner hereso what Submit your own haiku for a chance to be featured on our website and in the print magazine.

A lesson in finding the courage to embrace the unknown

Given the current state of our world, the theme of being rooted in groundlessness seems both relevant and urgent. Read a teaching on the subject by writer and Zen teacher Vanessa Zuisei Goddard.

Interview with Tibetan musician Tenzin ChoegyaI

With the release of his latest album, Yeshi DolmaTenzin Choegyal, one of the world’s finest Tibetan musicians, blends tradition with genre-transcending sounds. Read an interview with Choegyal here.

A short guided meditation to release tension

In the first of our For the moment series on embodiment, Andrea Fella, teacher of Insight Meditation, guides us through the experience of emotions on a bodily level in order to transform and release stress. listen now.

June 20: Dependent Emergence Course

Tricycle’s new online course, led by Bodhi College co-founders Stephen Batchelor, Christina Feldman, John Peacock and Akincano Weber, will explore the foundational teaching of dependent arising. Read a excerpt from the course hereand register here.

June 28: Listen to Buddhist texts

Join Buddhist scholar Sarah Shaw as she demonstrates the unique spiritual and historical insights that emerge when we engage with Buddhist suttas as oral literature. register here.

July 1: Meditation Posture Workshop

Join us as we explore the principles of meditation posture in a one-hour virtual workshop with Will Johnson, meditation teacher and author of The posture of meditation. register here.

The prize, formerly called the Orange Prize and then the Baileys Prize, is given to the “best novel of the year written by a woman” written in English and published in the United Kingdom. Listen to an interview on our podcast, Tricycle Talkswith Ozeki on the book here.

The award-winning poet, who earned his MFA in poetry from NYU, will join the university’s Faculty of Arts and Science as a professor of creative writing this fall. Listen to a life as it is podcast episode with Vuong on his latest collection of poetry, time is a motherhere.

Software engineer Blake LeMoine and a collaborator conducted a series of chat “interviews” with an AI chatbot on topics such as zen koan and transcendental meditation. LeMoine was later placed on paid leave after claiming the AI ​​was sentient.

A humanoid robot named “Mindar”, which was created by a team from Osaka University’s Systems Innovation Department, gives weekly sermons at the historic Kodaiji temple in Kyoto.

Four bills allowing same-sex marriage and partnership in Thailand have been approved for the first time, just days after Bangkok celebrated its first Pride parade in 16 years.

In response to the ongoing war and refugee crisis in Ukraine, the Tzu Chi Buddhist Foundation, a global humanitarian organization based in Taiwan, has distributed 45,000 aid vouchers, worth $450 each, to refugees .



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Dalai Lama Concludes Two-Day Avalokiteshvara Empowerment in Dharamshala http://gurugama.org/dalai-lama-concludes-two-day-avalokiteshvara-empowerment-in-dharamshala/ Wed, 15 Jun 2022 15:41:27 +0000 http://gurugama.org/dalai-lama-concludes-two-day-avalokiteshvara-empowerment-in-dharamshala/ By Choekyi Lhamo DHARAMSHALA, June 15: The octogenarian Tibetan leader on Tuesday concluded a two-day Avalokiteshvara initiation to a group of devotees including Tibetans, Vietnamese, as well as locals and tourists at Tsuglagkhang Temple in McLeod Ganj. “The center of my meditation is bodhichittaand that reassures me. Bodhichitta is fundamental to my own feelings of […]]]>

By Choekyi Lhamo

DHARAMSHALA, June 15: The octogenarian Tibetan leader on Tuesday concluded a two-day Avalokiteshvara initiation to a group of devotees including Tibetans, Vietnamese, as well as locals and tourists at Tsuglagkhang Temple in McLeod Ganj. “The center of my meditation is bodhichittaand that reassures me. Bodhichitta is fundamental to my own feelings of joy as well as to the joy of others. Likewise, world peace will only materialize when more people experience a peaceful and compassionate state of mind,” he told his followers on the auspicious 15th.e day of the religious festival of Saga Dawa, an occasion to commemorate the birth of Buddha, his attainment of enlightenment and his salvation from this samsara.

“The subtlest mind is known as the innate and spontaneously arising mind of clear light, which is the ultimate basis for designating a person,” the spiritual leader said, noting that the highest yoga tantra must be void of any objective and independent existence. in itself.

The Nobel laureate also recalled that Tibetans had a special connection with Avalokiteshvara since the days of King Songtsen Gampo. His Holiness on Tuesday described how Songtsen Gampo chose to model Tibetan script on Indian Devanagari script. “A century later, when Shantarakshita was invited to Tibet, he recognized the language’s potential and strongly recommended that Buddhist literature be translated into Tibetan,” he further informed his followers.

The Dalai Lama noted that after their exile, Tibetans sought help from the Indian government, led by former Prime Minister Pandit Nehru, to establish separate schools where Tibetans could study in their own language. South Indian monasteries were also reestablished after the great centers of learning in Tibet.

The Dalai Lama also pointed out the stark differences between Tibetan Buddhism and Chinese Communism: “Chinese Communists have tried in vain to restrict Tibetan Buddhist culture, and it is clear that Tibetan Buddhist philosophy is deeper than Chinese Communism. Contrary to this ideology, Tibetans exercise a kind of Buddhist democracy in their monasteries and nunneries.

The initiation was attended by at least 8,000 devotees, mostly Tibetans, made up of monks and nuns from various monasteries. It was at the request of Tai Situ Rinpoche that His Holiness gave the initiation Chenrezig Gyalwa Gyatso (Avalokiteshvara Jinasagara), which is one of the highest yoga tantras among the four classes of tantra. At the end of the ceremony, members of the Palpung and Chango communities presented lifetime offerings to His Holiness. On June 24, the Dalai Lama will attend a long life prayer offered to him by Tibetan groups at the main temple in Dharamshala.

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Buddha relic to strengthen India-Mongolia relations http://gurugama.org/buddha-relic-to-strengthen-india-mongolia-relations/ Sun, 12 Jun 2022 18:22:36 +0000 http://gurugama.org/buddha-relic-to-strengthen-india-mongolia-relations/ House ” Diplomacy » Buddha relic to strengthen India-Mongolia relations Posted By: Gopi June 12, 2022 Hindon (UP)June 12 (SocialNews.XYZ) India and Mongolia are bound by the three “Ds” – Democracy, Dharma and Development – partnership. To highlight the relevance of the Buddhist bond between the two countries, India has decided to airlift a relic […]]]>

Hindon (UP)June 12 (SocialNews.XYZ) India and Mongolia are bound by the three “Ds” – Democracy, Dharma and Development – partnership.

To highlight the relevance of the Buddhist bond between the two countries, India has decided to airlift a relic of the Buddha to Mongolia for display at Gandan Monastery on Buddha Jayanti Day celebrated on June 14.


The delegation carrying the relic includes representatives of the International Buddhist Confederation and a group of monks led by Law and Justice Minister Kiren Rijiju.

Rijiju has visited Mongolia in the past and is considered and respected by Buddhist leaders in Mongolia as a messenger of Buddhism from India.

A special Indian Air Force aircraft will transport the relic with the delegation.

Source: IANS

Buddha relic to strengthen India-Mongolia relations

About Gopi

Gopi Adusumilli is a programmer. He is the editor of SocialNews.XYZ and president of AGK Fire Inc.

He enjoys designing websites, developing mobile apps and publishing news articles from various authenticated news sources.

As for writing, he enjoys writing about current world politics and Indian movies. His future plans include developing SocialNews.XYZ into a news website that has no bias or judgment towards any.

He can be reached at gopi@socialnews.xyz

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Q&A: The Dicks’ Gary Floyd Talks Lifetime Creativity Ahead of Austin Art Exhibit: Maybe We’ll See Butterflies opens tomorrow at Prizer Arts & Letters – Music http://gurugama.org/qa-the-dicks-gary-floyd-talks-lifetime-creativity-ahead-of-austin-art-exhibit-maybe-well-see-butterflies-opens-tomorrow-at-prizer-arts-letters-music/ Fri, 10 Jun 2022 20:33:26 +0000 http://gurugama.org/qa-the-dicks-gary-floyd-talks-lifetime-creativity-ahead-of-austin-art-exhibit-maybe-well-see-butterflies-opens-tomorrow-at-prizer-arts-letters-music/ A work from Gary Floyd’s upcoming Maybe We’ll See Butterflies (Courtesy of Prizer Arts & Letters) Gary Floyd will zoom in to say hello to guests as his exhibit opens, but won’t stay on screen for too long. The pioneering punk bandleader says it might be corny. Continuing his work with Austin’s Prizer Arts and […]]]>

A work from Gary Floyd’s upcoming Maybe We’ll See Butterflies (Courtesy of Prizer Arts & Letters)

Gary Floyd will zoom in to say hello to guests as his exhibit opens, but won’t stay on screen for too long. The pioneering punk bandleader says it might be corny.

Continuing his work with Austin’s Prizer Arts and Letters gallery, the multi-format artist launches his latest visual collection Maybe we’ll see butterflies tomorrow June 11 from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. Due to health issues, Floyd won’t be able to leave San Francisco, where he moved after founding seminal ’80s Austin band the Dicks, one of hardcore music’s first openly gay vocalists. Dicks bassist Buxf Parrot plays opening night, alongside Todd Kassens and Walter Daniels.

The gallery is also promising a large card to sign and all proceeds from the purchase of the prints will go directly to the artist. After the opening, the salon will be open on Saturdays and Sundays from 12 p.m. to 5 p.m. and by appointment.

The the Chronicle called Floyd to his longtime California home, where he’s fronted bands like Sister Double Happiness, Black Kali Ma and the Buddha Brothers for the past four decades. Struggling with walking difficulties due to diabetes and congenital heart failure, the 69-year-old still hopes for a visit to Austin soon. Perfect for Pride Month, the gay icon offered wisdom on lifelong creativity, sobriety, chosen family and the importance of pausing to look out the window.

Austin Chronicle: Where does the title come from? Maybe we’ll see butterflies comes from?

gary floyd: [Prizer Arts Director Carrie Kenny] in fact I chose it in the little artistic statement I wrote. Kinda hippy to me, right? What good punk rocker would ever call anything after butterfly in love? I’m happy to break all those molds and not be too locked into one idea. So, hippie butterfly, let it be. It’s that stubborn, stubborn Texas part. I’ll say I’m a hippie, but if you say I’m a hippie, I’ll say, “Well wait a minute now, I’m a punk rocker.” And if you say, “Well, okay, you’re a punk rocker,” I’ll say, “Just wait a minute now!” It’s still fighting the titles hanging around your neck.

It’s that stubborn, stubborn Texas part. I’ll say I’m a hippie, but if you say I’m a hippie, I’ll say, “Well wait a minute now, I’m a punk rocker.” And if you say, “Well, okay, you’re a punk rocker,” I’ll say, “Just wait a minute now!” It’s still fighting the titles hanging around your neck.

THAT: You can’t come from San Francisco for the exhibition. How are you?

GF: The last time I had an art exhibition [in Austin] was February 2020, so since this happened the COVID thing continues. I have diseases that come with age, like it’s just hard for me to walk around like I used to. The last thing I wanted to do was get on a plane with COVID going on. And [during the pandemic] I had an accident – I fell and broke my ribs and had a heart attack. I was in the hospital for a while. You need a calculator to count my illnesses.

I had to be careful, so I was hanging around my house all the time. My spouse was an essential worker. I found myself not painting, which was unusual – like I usually had to stop painting because I had no place to put my things. So even though I didn’t really use my paints, canvases and paper, I still wanted to be able to make creative artwork. So I started taking a lot of pictures, and putting them on the iPad and manipulating them with different colors and drawing little things.

For a few years we had planned to do a show, but things kept happening and I got sick and couldn’t come. It was a depressing scene, because I’ve been doing public stuff in music since 1980. It was hard, all of a sudden realizing that I really couldn’t do this with the best of health intentions. I’m touched by the fact that [the show] will go ahead and happen and I don’t have to be there. Now that I’ve started painting again, I plan to come back [to Austin]. I mean, I get so much attention when I’m there. How not to like that?

THAT: Is this your first exhibition created digitally?

GF: Oh, honey – that is my first time. This is probably something I denounced 10 or 15 years ago, but then I found it quite easy to do and changed my mind. It’s a creative outlet. I don’t make as much music now, and that can be difficult, because that’s how I defined a lot of who I was – as a musician. Some [artworks] are very witty and some are dirty, and that’s how my work has generally been.

THAT: I’ll have to see a dirty.

GF: One day, I said to Carrie: “You know, there are photos that I did not send to you.” She said, “Oh, why?” and I said, “Well, they’re very penis-friendly.” I don’t know if she uses them [in the show], but I don’t take any of them too seriously. With the spiritual things in there, for me, there is no contradiction. Also, I’m not trying to get too in your face with this. I spent 40 years standing in front of you. I’m just a good old Buddhist now.

THAT: What does your daily routine look like?

GF: I made two books – a mini autobiography [Please Bee Nice: My Life Up ‘Til Now, 2014] and [I Said That, 2017] with the lyrics of the Dicks songs. Now I’m writing a different book with my co-editor, David Ensminger, who lives in Houston. That’s a lot of trying. It’s just my mind, a free flow, things that happened in the past and how I interpret them – no names, just the imprint of what they left behind. Seems like I’m getting heavy and all, but that’s how I talk. Some are quite dark, but I’m not afraid of that. So I write almost every day. I listen to a lot of music and look out the back window and see the wind blowing, and I meditate a lot and chat on the phone. I FaceTime like crazy. I have a physiotherapist who comes to my house once a week, so I try to get some exercise and not get sick or fall.

It’s every elderly person’s nightmare. There’s always someone behind you yelling, “You’re going to break your hip. But somehow, my spirit and my ambitions, like the plan in my head – it’s been the same for a long, long time. That probably means I was pretty mature then, and I’m pretty immature now. I am very happy. I look at the world and what a horrible situation things are in, but you know what? You have to look at where happiness is and try to focus on it a little without being naive. There are positives here. I am usually between 12 and 15 years old and sometimes I am 70 years old.

THAT: How old are you really?

GF: I am 69 years old. I will be 70 in December. It’s kind of weird, but the whole concept has to be reassessed when you start to get older, because we’ve always been such a young culture. If we get lost in there, we’re going to be a little panicked. I don’t walk away from the fact that I am old. I don’t even know how important it is to be cool anymore. I certainly don’t see cooler, younger people knocking me over when I see them. I used to say “Damn, I’m cool” and I hope people will understand that it’s a joke.

My family is gone, but I was so lucky to have a family among my friends, my chosen family. And luckily they chose me again. It’s like – I could die here; I could die there. I could die on the plane on the way [to Texas]and i will be happy because i had wonderful friends and a full life.

THAT: Have you had any thoughts on recent news from Texas, such as politician Bryan Slaton’s proposal to ban underage drag shows?

GF: Here the drag queens do readings at the public library of children’s books, and they came and raised the hell about it. The main thing when I think of Texas is the [Uvalde] shooting, and back and forth on how to deal with it. People who suffer and parents who see their grandchildren killed. It really broke my heart – and then they worry about a fucking drag show. Get your fucking priorities straight. Forget the drag queen who might make your kids laugh and sing, and think about what’s really going on. It’s not just Texas. It’s everywhere.

We just have to rely on something higher, something better in us, and it is difficult to deviate from what is happening politically. Texas is where I grew up. I’ve lived in San Francisco longer than I’ve lived anywhere – I moved here in 1982 with the Dicks. The original guys came back, but I’ve been pretty much in bands since. My home is where I am with my friends. My family is gone, but I was so lucky to have a family among my friends, my chosen family. And luckily they chose me again. It’s like – I could die here; I could die there. I could die on the plane on the way [to Texas], and I will be happy because I had wonderful friends and a full life. It’s still ongoing.

THAT: How is your health now?

GF: I have very bad diabetes, so I have to take three different insulins a day. I have congenital heart failure. I had a lot of fluid accumulating around my heart. That’s why I fell and ended up losing 40 pounds of fluid in the hospital over the two weeks I was there. I was much better after that, but it’s still an ongoing project. I have all these problems, and there are bills, but I try to stay sunny. As my astrologer says, “I’m not diabetic, but I have diabetes.” The thing is, I can’t walk, because the blood flow in my body slows as it moves away from the heart, ie the legs. So even in my house I have to use a walker.

I don’t drink anymore though. I quit about 12 years ago, and oh boy, I was a wonderful drunk. I’ve been around Europe nine times, and people want to surpass the previous city in the quality of their beer. But one day, I was doing a show at a club here in town, and I realized I was on all these diabetes meds. Diabetes is really fueled by alcohol because alcohol immediately turns into sugar in your system. So I said, “No, I think I’ve had enough,” and I haven’t had a drink since. I’ve never been bothered by drinking and then not drinking, and I realize that’s not always the case, so I feel very lucky.

THAT: You just flipped the switch.

GF: That’s a good way to put it. I did it. Of course, I have a few other vices that have increased, and that’s all I’ll say about them.

A work from Gary Floyd’s upcoming Maybe We’ll See Butterflies (Courtesy of Prizer Arts & Letters)

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Nine Simple Ways to Contemplate Death – Buddhistdoor Global http://gurugama.org/nine-simple-ways-to-contemplate-death-buddhistdoor-global/ Mon, 06 Jun 2022 03:20:56 +0000 http://gurugama.org/nine-simple-ways-to-contemplate-death-buddhistdoor-global/ In the Abhaya Sutta (AN 4.84), a Brahman named Janussonin tells the Buddha that he believes that anyone subject to death is absolutely terrified of death. He doesn’t believe that anyone can face death without fear. The Buddha agrees that there are those who are afraid of death. And there are those who do not […]]]>

In the Abhaya Sutta (AN 4.84), a Brahman named Janussonin tells the Buddha that he believes that anyone subject to death is absolutely terrified of death. He doesn’t believe that anyone can face death without fear. The Buddha agrees that there are those who are afraid of death. And there are those who do not live in terror of death. And then he teaches the difference between those who have overcome their fear of death and those who have not. Spoiler alert: clinging, craving, unskillful actions and doubting the teachings lead to frightening deaths. Letting go of attachment, living a life of good deeds and trusting the Dhamma is the path to a peaceful death.

The Buddha teaches attention to death in the Maranasati Sutta (AN 6.19). In the Satipatthana Sutta (MN 10), he used the contemplation of the charnel ground to remind monks that their bodies are subject to breaking and dissolving, and therefore clinging to the body should be avoided. These are not light lessons. Nor should they be.

Getting to the point where you can consciously recognize that death can happen before you finish reading this sentence takes effort. You know it’s worth it.

“The perception of death, when developed and pursued, is of great fruit, of great benefit. He takes a foothold in the Immortal, has the Immortal as his ultimate end: “Thus it was said, and in reference to this was it said.

(AN 7.46)

If you’re like me, some days a deep dive into the suttas just isn’t within reach. Or you might benefit from other ways to feel comfortable with death. It can be helpful to spend time understanding the beliefs you have about death and dying. And to notice the emotions that arise for you when you contemplate death.

Here are nine thoughts on death. You can use them as mantras, as meditation objects, or as a way to start thoughtful discussions with your family or friends. I invite you to review this list and add to or subtract from it in a way that supports you in your own practice.

1. Death is inevitable. You to know it intellectually. Do you know this as part of your inner wisdom? Can you think about this and not be disturbed? You know, one plus one is two, everybody dies, two plus two is four, I will die too. Each of these sentences are facts, but even if you don’t like math, the sentences everyone dies and I will die too are probably the sentences that make you feel uncomfortable.

2. Death can seem capricious. When your 100-year-old grandmother dies, you can easily make sense of it. But there is also the newborn or the new father who made the wrong intersection. There will be death, and beyond knowing that all living creatures die can defy logic or your sense of fairness. Stop expecting logic and fairness. Remember that every living being has its own karma.

3. Death is normal. Breathing is a normal bodily function, and it is also normal to eventually stop breathing. This does not mean that it should be trivialized. Normal does not mean insignificant. The death of someone you love has an impact. And the good news is that since death is not unknown, you live in a world where medical, financial, emotional, and spiritual support systems are in place to guide you.

4. Death is an integral part of life. Humans have many different stages. And most of them are recognized and celebrated. In most cultures, we help children prepare to become adults and we help adults develop to raise their children. Sometimes we help prepare each other to become seniors. But too often we leave out the discussion and the preparation for death. This is why so many people are surprised by death.

5. Death is like a snowflake. No two are the same. Each death is precious and unique. There are so many things we don’t see. Most of the time we see the outward result; a heart stops beating, the breath stops. But each person has a unique last moment. Your ability to help someone experience peace in their final moment is invaluable.

6. Life is precious, death too. Those who live with an acceptance of death die with fewer regrets. Death teaches us not to waste time. Death teaches us not to get drawn into petty squabbles.

seven. Death is neither bad nor bad. Take this as an invitation to practice equanimity. Starting with this short statement is a big step.

8. There’s more than one way to celebrate a life. Now is not the time for you and your family to argue over prayers, songs, and memorial services. Just be flexible and celebrate your loved one in the best possible way.

9. Everyone grieves differently. Work on being non-judgmental. I saw loving, crying, praying, laughing and much more. The best advice? Don’t hurt yourself or others. Be patient and practice self-compassion. Even those who prepare for death will experience grief.

The goal is that by contemplating these ideas, you will become less fearful and more comfortable. As you go through the list, pay attention to your initial reactions to each one. What surfaces? Do you feel resistance, anger, fear, sadness, anything else? What’s going on in your body? You could even keep a journal, write down your responses to the statements that elicit your strongest feelings, and figure out why some of the statements are easy for you to process.

Every day you can work to develop and pursue your perception of death. Some days you will have the time and energy to go into a deep practice of mindfulness of death. When that is not possible for you, work with thoughts like the list provided here to continue to grow and make your death practice even more accessible.

See more

Margaret Meloni: Dhamma of Death
The Dhamma of Death Podcast (Margaret Meloni)

BDG Related Features

embrace your sorrow
The promise of impermanence
Maranasati Is for all of us

Related videos from BDG

The Death Dhamma Season 1 Podcast
The Death Dhamma Season 2 Podcast

More dhamma of death by Margaret Meloni

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Meet the Author: Local Yogi Writes Spiritual Fiction Novel “Waiting Impatily” | Cobb Life Magazine http://gurugama.org/meet-the-author-local-yogi-writes-spiritual-fiction-novel-waiting-impatily-cobb-life-magazine/ Sat, 04 Jun 2022 20:28:00 +0000 http://gurugama.org/meet-the-author-local-yogi-writes-spiritual-fiction-novel-waiting-impatily-cobb-life-magazine/ Andrew H. Housley knows what it’s like to go through tremendous change. Housley, who grew up in Cobb County and graduated from Walton High School, is a yogi, IT professional, artist, singer-songwriter, master gardener, spiritual teacher, adventurer , a poet and, more recently, an author. Andrew H. Housley, author of “Waiting Impatily”. Special This year, […]]]>

Andrew H. Housley knows what it’s like to go through tremendous change.

Housley, who grew up in Cobb County and graduated from Walton High School, is a yogi, IT professional, artist, singer-songwriter, master gardener, spiritual teacher, adventurer , a poet and, more recently, an author.






Andrew H. Housley, author of “Waiting Impatily”.




This year, Housley published his first novel “Waiting Impatily”, a tale of one man’s spiritual metamorphosis. Published by Atmosphere Press, the story follows Ian, a well-honed yoga teacher and Zen student, on the precipice of his life. As the world begins to shut down in the face of a pandemic, Ian tries to accept the gift of self-examination while burying the pieces of his painful past.

Through Ian;’s journey, the reader is offered a unique and poignant perspective of one man’s internal struggle with ‘self’. In a desperate moment, he arrives at the Monastery, a place where time stands still. Here he finds comfort to soothe his soul and ponder the Zen riddle: “Can you manifest your true nature while gazing at the pieces of your broken heart?”

Housley lives and teaches around Atlanta. He has been practicing yoga for over 20 years. He is affectionately nicknamed “The Machine” for his ability to push himself with single purpose to achieve any goal he sets for himself. To purchase “Waiting Impatiently”, log on to www.andrewhhousley.com.

CL: How did the idea for “Waiting Impatily” come about?

Oh: I have always been intrigued by the idea of ​​living in a Buddhist monastery and what it would be like to be isolated with myself. At the start of the pandemic, I was living with a friend. Life was full of uncertainty back then; we just sat and spent hours having long, in-depth conversations on various topics, from spiritual attachment to how to make yogurt. When everyone had to shelter in place, I took advantage of the opportunity of confinement as a makeshift monastery. It gave me time to examine my struggles with the human condition of attachment, personal history and how it causes us so much pain if we allow it.

CL: What makes this book different from other songs you’ve written? What connects it?

Oh: “Waiting Impatiently” was my first attempt at writing a novel. My second novel “Invisible Sun”, which is scheduled for release this fall, is a kind of prequel.

CL: What can readers expect from “Waiting Impatily”?

Oh: Who am I to set reader expectations? I hope the reader finds an open, raw, funny and emotional exploration of the struggle of the human condition and the transformation that awaits us all if we open our eyes to see it.

CL: How does inspiration hit you?

Oh: Inspiration never comes fully formed or without a bit of a struggle. You have to prepare, open up and make yourself available to it. A constant presence is required.

CL: Do you have any writing rituals/best practices?

Oh: Creating a consistent ritual is essential for me. I schedule a time to write every day from 2-4 p.m. and stick to it. When my writing time starts, the first thing I do is turn off my phone. There is something very liberating about digital disconnection and creating space for myself.

Some days the words will flow and I can write pages, while other days I might scratch to finish a single seemingly disposable sentence. I try to treat the most prolific and sparse days with the same sense of equality by telling myself, “You did enough today, and that’s great.

I scrape threads of ideas from half sheets of paper and leave them in a heap in my workspace if I get stuck writing; I read these threads and sometimes use them as starting points to weave the fabric of the story.

I never read what I write, never. So I don’t edit. Editing is a slippery slope, and since I’m constantly mulling over the writing, I don’t want to stop the process by continually questioning myself.

CL: What tips can you share with other budding local authors?

Oh: Be natural. Don’t limit yourself to what you think the reader wants to read. Arrives every day with no wait. Work to cultivate within yourself the understanding that the immediate gratification of “success” or completion is not the end goal of the process. Just showing up is enough.

The world is full of cheerleaders like friends and family telling you that your work is great and worthy of awards. Your work is probably superb, and your “Rah!” Rah!” the support system is fantastic. Yet to truly excel in your medium, you need to surround yourself with professionals who can challenge you constructively and without judgment. Learn to receive feedback from people who understand support and the industry can greatly help you hone your tool as a writer.

CL: How has your environment influenced your work?

Oh: I spend a lot of time walking in the woods to soak in and collect my thoughts before each writing session. I believe it is imperative to have a dedicated writing space. Having time and space is integral to my success.

CL: What is your favorite thing about writing? Your least favorite?

Oh: I don’t particularly enjoy reading what I write. I am my own harshest critic. I like to use the protagonists I create in my stories to explore possibilities for new directions, dialogues, or thought processes in my own life the same way an actor uses a character in a movie or play.

CL: Who are you currently reading?

Oh: No time to waste – Pema Chodron

CL: Why did you start writing? What prompted you to take the leap?

Oh: Synchronicity. The story came when I was emotionally and intellectually ready to articulate it. My partner Sujata encouraged me from the start. Without his support and trust in me, the story would never have been published.

CL: What/who is your all-time favorite book/author? Why?

Oh: There are so many for so many different reasons.

Siddartha – Hermann Hesse

Ask the Dust – John Fante

The Stranger – Albert Camus

Death on Credit – Louis-Ferdinand Celine

Soil Growth – Knut Hamsun

Black Rain – Masuji Ibuse

The Ring of the Path – Taisen Deshimaru

CL: What distinguishes your work from other authors of the same genre?

Oh: The unfiltered access to protagonist Ian’s introspective, sarcastic, and heartbreaking voice is unique to the Spiritism genre. The reader can connect to his thoughts, interactions and metamorphoses in real time. I have found that rarely in literature is the male voice so vulnerable and accessible. Societal stereotypes tell us that men cannot be thoughtful, sensitive, or display emotions. We are fed garbage that we have to push away feelings, rub dirt on and suck it up.

The following is an excerpt from Andrew Housley’s latest book “Waiting Impatily”.

… I stop to reflect on the beauty in front of me. I climb on the thick trunk of an age-old tree in the shape of a hand. Sitting in the palm of this proud giant oak tree, its five large fingers reach up protectively, surrounding me. Farther on I can see the scattered clumps of dormant dogwood trees above the sparkle of a stream flowing water down the narrow serpentine spine of the hill to the river waiting in the distance. Twenty meters away stand the dead remains of a tree like the one I’m sitting on. His hollow limbs gripped the heavy chains of thick green vines, slowly overtaking him, dismantling him and dragging him back to Earth. An immense sadness came over me.

I think of the two trees; which they had witnessed during their 100 years of existence. Unexpectedly, they accidentally caught life at the same time. They have been through periods of drought, pollution, heavy rains, high winds and more than an inconsiderate dog together. They most likely suffered, but continued through this period, becoming more resilient to the shadow of each other’s growth support. At some point, whether through lightning or illness, a life companion gave way to death. Leaving the other alone in this beautiful cursed place to see his partner disintegrating little by little. I cry tears of despair; the nature of time can be so cruel.

Protected inside the healing hand, I fight for stillness but quickly give up my attack. Eyes closed, I surrender little by little to the power and energy of the place. My mind is flooded with koans.

“Am I like this mighty oak tree? What is my true nature when I think of this tree?

“Will I get through this time of uncertainty and continue to thrive?”

“Will I adapt and grow?”

“Am I doomed to live this life alone?”

“Will I get to the other side any other way?”

“Yes, I will be unable to hide the twists, knots and broken limbs that come with this change. Wear them as a badge of honor.

My heart swells with sympathy. Effortlessly, I tune into that feeling, wrapping my arms around her, feeling the warmth of her grip. In this caress, I am lifted. Like the wind through the trees, my soul screams to be free, and thoughts of my father, his painful dance with the nature of time, invade the wasteland of my mind.

A text from my dad. “I die.” Simple, direct, devoid of emotion, and a fact, the only way he knew how to communicate. He never texted or called, for that matter. We hadn’t spoken to each other for years. Some things were better left unsaid.

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Will the International Booker Prize open a global window on Hindi books? http://gurugama.org/will-the-international-booker-prize-open-a-global-window-on-hindi-books/ Fri, 03 Jun 2022 06:28:50 +0000 http://gurugama.org/will-the-international-booker-prize-open-a-global-window-on-hindi-books/ translator, translator. “The translator is the traitor”, they say in Italian. Such was the distrust and paranoia in Europe of translations that the learned linguist William Tyndale was executed in 1536 for “heresy” he had committed in translating the New Testament into English. The sacred could not be converted into an inferior language. A decade […]]]>

translator, translator. “The translator is the traitor”, they say in Italian. Such was the distrust and paranoia in Europe of translations that the learned linguist William Tyndale was executed in 1536 for “heresy” he had committed in translating the New Testament into English. The sacred could not be converted into an inferior language. A decade later, legendary French translator Etienne Dolet was executed for what they believed was a mistranslation of Plato and all of his works were burned with him. Five centuries later, an Indian author has won a major literary prize and shared it with her American translator, making it a good opportunity to discuss the status of translation in world literature and the role translations play in the canonization of a text, as well as becoming a cultural mediator between the two languages.

On the surface, translations help spread knowledge from one language to another. They enrich the target language and allow the source language to reach a wider audience. But which works are translated, into which languages ​​and from which pen are the questions that play a decisive role in the development of the text. A translation into a politically and economically weaker language will not help the text as a translation into a language of power does. A translation of an English novel into Hindi or Marathi will bring it to speakers of those languages, but the original novel needs no validation or critical acclaim, let alone an international award for those languages. While translating a Hindi novel into French and publishing it in Paris, or translating it into English and publishing it in the UK catapults it onto the world stage. We can blame ourselves, but it is the reality. Before Geetanjali Shree’s English translation Ret Samadhi published in the United Kingdom, its French translation, Beyond the Borderhad been published in Paris and had received a grand prize.

Theologians working on Luther’s translation of the Bible Photos: Getty Images

Pascale Casanova in her flagship work, The World Republic of Letters, vividly tells how Paris was crowned literary capital of the world and how French translations gave writers a new identity. Take James Joyce’s influential French translator, Valery Larbaud, who “succeeded in saving him from an invincible provincialism” and universalized the Dublin chronicler. Even Latin American writers have entered the international literary circuit mainly through their translation into French and their recognition by French critics.

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Long before translations became a tool for disseminating literature, they helped spread religions to different and distant shores. It was the great Buddhist scholar Kumarajiva who translated several Buddhist scriptures from Sanskrit into Chinese and played a singular role in spreading the religion and its philosophy in China and East Asia. After initial apprehensions, the Bible ended up being translated into some 2,400 languages ​​and became an integral part of the Western conquest of Asia, Africa and South America. Today it is the most translated text in the history of mankind. In his test, translate the sacred, Robert Barnes points out that this was made possible “primarily because Christians believe that the message of the Bible can be presented in any language”. While the Quran has also been translated into many languages, “Muslims view these translations as mere aids in understanding the original Arabic, which is the only text considered inspired.”

Bell detail at Kumarajiva Pagoda, China
Bell detail at Kumarajiva Pagoda, China Photos: Getty Images

What was the situation in India? Indians effortlessly translate their religious texts into several languages ​​spoken across the country. The many Ramayanas and Mahabharatas written in several Indian languages ​​over the past two millennia have been marked by endless variations. Not only was there not a single holy book, but there was also no singular version of religious texts. During the time when European scholars were being executed for rendering the sacred word in inferior languages, Tulsidas deliberately rejected the “language of God”, Sanskrit, and chose regional Awadhi to write. Ramcharitmanas, a text that quickly reached millions of homes in northern India. Mughal rulers commissioned the translations of a range of Sanskrit texts into Persian. Akbar even established Maktab Khana, the House of Translations, in which he invited a series of translators and illustrators to translate Sanskrit texts into Persian.

A monk at a monastery in Majuli, Assam.
A monk at a monastery in Majuli, Assam.

However, while the Mughal exercise was deliberate translation, a fixed and certain text, the others were narratives, essentially variations on existing tales. “Despite the presence of many languages, there was no ‘translation’ in the Western sense in India during the first 3,000 years of its literary history, until the colonial impact in the 19th century. It was for the good reason that literary production in India was seen as a collaborative and collective activity with little value placed on individuality or originality,” says literary scholar Harish Trivedi.

The Art of the Traitor

To find out how the tradition is still carried on, you can visit the Vaishnavite monastery, Auniati Satra, in Majuli, the great river island of Brahmaputra. Here the monks study and work on ancient texts and manuscripts. A plaque at the monastery has a Sanskrit shloka inscribed in the Assamese language: “All that I write may be wrong for even Bhima has been defeated in a battle.” The shloka appears at the end of several Sanskrit texts as an apology for the anonymous copyist, a humble admission of his fallibility that he might have made several errors in copying and thus deviated from the “original” text. This explained why there was rarely a single version of several ancient and medieval texts, which were passed down from generation to generation by assiduous copiers, and even the greatest copier could not easily have offered a “true” fac -similar. But the shloka could also be a narrative device to add a layer of ambiguity to the text and complicate its reading and its receptions, and it could also reflect the desire of the anonymous copyist to leave his fingerprints on the text. Several centuries later, Umberto Eco’s narrator in The name of the rose inserted a similar admission into the foreword of the manuscript he had found and later copied.

Before Geetanjali Shree’s English translation Ret Samadhi appeared in the United Kingdom, its French translation had been published in Paris.

Also, there are several words in Indian languages ​​to translate, and several languages ​​have more than one word, used quite interchangeably, which in a way reflects the composite literature and philosophy of the nation, unlike English where the word translation seems to have no synonym. The Indian stories can best be explained through the example of Tulsidas who claimed at the beginning of the Ramcharitmanas that he composed this text “for his own pleasure”. This contrasts sharply with, says Trivedi, “the translations of the Bible into the many languages ​​of the world which have almost all been undertaken to serve the larger God-ordained mission of converting the pagans.”

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Translations also shape an author’s afterlife and help create a cult following, Franz Kafka being the greatest example. And the translations also allow the translator to understand the nuances of both languages. A translator often undertakes a long and excruciating search for a precise word that captures the sentiment well in the source language. French novelist Gustave Flaubert wrote of his long struggle to find the right word for the emotion bubbling within him. A translator’s struggle is perhaps more difficult. A shiny word is in front of you but you cannot find its exact replica. You ask friends, check dictionaries, but that word doesn’t exist, then you make one up before exploding with joy.

The Art of the Traitor

The first text I translated was Kafka’s short story hunger artist. It was at the suggestion of my editor friend Piyush Daiya who rejected my first short story, saying that I should try translations first to learn the “music of words”. In my early twenties, I spent a full year translating various texts, ranging from essays by modern artists, musicologists to a long excerpt from Ramchandra Gandhi Svaraja meditation from a book on Tyeb Mehta’s painting Shantiniketan Triptych. Some writers regularly engage in translations in order to have an intense duel with languages. This makes them aware of the hidden sounds and alphabets of their own language, otherwise one is prone to blunder; none greater than the person who published Chekhov’s masterpiece The lady with the dog in hindi like Kutte Wali Mahila.

Mughal rulers commissioned translations of a range of Sanskrit texts into Persian. Akbar even created Maktab Khana, the House of Translations.

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We can end with the hope and excitement that the International Booker has brought to India. It is said that the award will open a global window to books in Hindi, as well as Indian languages. Pray for this, but note that Rabindranath Tagore lived for three decades after receiving the Nobel Prize. He was an imposing novelist, poet, musicologist, painter, thinker, public intellectual, a leading figure in the freedom movement. He was friends with some of the most powerful Indians and had a considerable worldwide following. And yet, the Nobel could only ensure that his Bengali language had little place on the world stage. The next Bengali text that received wide recognition in the West came several decades later – the short story by Mahasweta Devi Draupadi, which might not have been possible without the signing of Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak, a towering presence in the western academy. Spivak, who also returned Derrida’s book Of Grammatology in English, translated and taken Draupadi to the world. The other Bengali novelist, Amitav Ghosh, present all over the world, chose English as his creative language.

Ramayana in Persian script.  Photography: Shutterstock
Ramayana in Persian script. Photography: Shutterstock.

Before reaching the world podium, Hindi faces a continuous struggle with various Indian languages, in addition to the powerful obstacle of English Indian writers, who seem rarely willing to offer a place for Indian languages. In 1997 Salman Rushdie co-edited a “definitive” and influential volume of Indian writing since independence. With the exception of a short story by Satyajit Ray and Manto, all the works were by English Indian writers. Languages ​​other than English, used by more than a billion people, took up 22 out of 600 pages, or 3.6% of the book. Twenty-five years later, as we celebrate Geetanjali’s award, a 908-page tome celebrating Indian poetry has appeared. Not a single poet of any Indian language in this pompously titled book The Penguin Book of Indian Poets.

(This appeared in the print edition as “Art of the Traitor”)

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Saudi Arabia welcomes racist Sri Lankan monk to fight ‘religious extremism’ http://gurugama.org/saudi-arabia-welcomes-racist-sri-lankan-monk-to-fight-religious-extremism/ Tue, 31 May 2022 22:23:11 +0000 http://gurugama.org/saudi-arabia-welcomes-racist-sri-lankan-monk-to-fight-religious-extremism/ Renowned Sri Lankan Buddhist monk Galagodaaththe Gnanasara was welcomed by Saudi officials in Riyadh as the kingdom offered support to stamp out “religious extremism” in Sri Lanka. Gnanasara had been invited for a two-day visit apparently at the request of Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed Bin Salman. However, a senior BBS (Body Bala Sena) representative, Dilantha […]]]>

Renowned Sri Lankan Buddhist monk Galagodaaththe Gnanasara was welcomed by Saudi officials in Riyadh as the kingdom offered support to stamp out “religious extremism” in Sri Lanka.

Gnanasara had been invited for a two-day visit apparently at the request of Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed Bin Salman. However, a senior BBS (Body Bala Sena) representative, Dilantha Withanage, refuted the claim pointing out that they were not invited by Salman and had no discussions with him or the MoD. regarding religious extremism in Sri Lanka. He did not reject his presence in Riyadh during the discussions at the highest level.

Gnanasara, a former convict, is known for his bigotry and violence, having been convicted of threatening the wife of Prageeth Eknaligoda; critic of the then government in 2010. He was released from prison following a presidential pardon.

In October 2021, he was tasked with leading the Sri Lankan President’s controversial presidential task force focused on achieving “One Country, One Law”. A task force which has come under heavy criticism from human rights organizations and which the International Commission of Jurists says could be used to target minorities.

Gnanasara has come under heavy criticism for spreading hate speech and attacking religious minorities. In 2014, before the anti-Muslim riots, he told a cheering Sinhalese nationalist crowd in Aluthgama that “if a marakkalaya (Muslim) gets his hands on a Sinhalese, it will be the end of all.” The resulting violence killed four people and left 80 injured, and hundreds homeless. Among the sites attacked were mosques, Muslim homes, businesses and even a nursery.

While the Body Bala Sena (BBS), Gnanasara’s organization, has denied responsibility for the riots, it has repeatedly stoked fear among the Sinhala public by warning them of the need to resist eradication. The BBS also has close ties to Myanmar extremist 969 and radical monk Wirathu, who are also criticized for stoking resentment against the Rohingya population.

Gnanasara has vehemently opposed Tamil rights to self-determination, threatening a “river of blood” last year.

“We will not allow the Tamils ​​to find a solution through decentralization. If they demand a separate state again, a river of blood will flow in the North and East.

The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia has also come under heavy criticism for propagating religious extremism through its promotion of Wahhabism, “a rigid, intolerant, highly dogmatic, puritanical and contrary to liberal values”. In Foreign Policy, Farah Pandith, former (and first) Special Representative for Muslim Communities to the US State Department, wrote that “extremism is Riyadh’s main export”.

Read more here.

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Nepal’s historic buildings are under threat from climate change http://gurugama.org/nepals-historic-buildings-are-under-threat-from-climate-change/ Sun, 29 May 2022 10:00:00 +0000 http://gurugama.org/nepals-historic-buildings-are-under-threat-from-climate-change/ In a 2012 article for The New York Times, journalist Edward Wong described the Nepalese district of Mustang as “a cauldron of myths”. Wong observed that “the stories people told had changed little over the centuries” and noted “the deep ravines, the biting wind, and the ancient cave houses” he saw in the area. The […]]]>

In a 2012 article for The New York Times, journalist Edward Wong described the Nepalese district of Mustang as “a cauldron of myths”. Wong observed that “the stories people told had changed little over the centuries” and noted “the deep ravines, the biting wind, and the ancient cave houses” he saw in the area. The Mustang district is located in the northern part of Nepal, and Upper Mustang has only been open to foreign visitors since 1992. There is, to say the least, a lot of history to be found there.

And now, as with so many things, climate change has put some of it at risk.

Writing to Atlas Obscura, Tulsi Rauniyar documented the style of architecture found in the area and the threats it currently faces. A number of Buddhist monasteries in the region, which have existed for centuries, were built using adobe techniques. This style of building is exactly what its name suggests; it is considered highly durable and has also been used for thousands of years.

This is one of the benefits of rammed earth buildings – they are made with a technique that has worked for countless generations. The downside, however, has to do with the climate. If a region’s climate begins to experience rapid changes, buildings that have stood for centuries may begin to falter. And that’s exactly what many Mustang District residents are seeing when it comes to where they live and work.

Rauniyar writes that the Mustang district is experiencing higher temperatures and damaging rainfall, both of which have adverse effects on local structures. To complicate matters further, the use of cement to replace rammed earth buildings, given that it is also not an optimal building material for the regional climate. It’s a difficult situation with few easy answers.

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Margaret Atwood, Don Winslow and John Grisham bring stories – and politics – to the Santa Fe Literary Festival http://gurugama.org/margaret-atwood-don-winslow-and-john-grisham-bring-stories-and-politics-to-the-santa-fe-literary-festival/ Sun, 22 May 2022 04:07:01 +0000 http://gurugama.org/margaret-atwood-don-winslow-and-john-grisham-bring-stories-and-politics-to-the-santa-fe-literary-festival/ Best-selling detective novelist Don Winslow kicked off the first full day of the Santa Fe Literary Festival by confirming that he intends to retire from writing novels. Taking to the main stage of the event early Saturday morning, he said his focus will now be on political activism, particularly the fight against Donald Trump and […]]]>

Best-selling detective novelist Don Winslow kicked off the first full day of the Santa Fe Literary Festival by confirming that he intends to retire from writing novels. Taking to the main stage of the event early Saturday morning, he said his focus will now be on political activism, particularly the fight against Donald Trump and the former president’s associates.

Although Winslow has said he is not a “political person”, he has felt pressured to become active as an activist since the events at the US Capitol on January 6, 2021, “We can’t choose our time “Winslow said. The Independent. “We just don’t, any more than anyone living quite peacefully in Ukraine until a few months ago can choose, not that I compare myself to them.”

Winslow set the tone for a day that featured both expert storytellers and a strong recurring theme of urgent political activism. He was followed on the main stage of the festival by The Handmaid’s Tale author Margaret Atwood, who spoke about the leaked memo from the Supreme Court suggesting the United States could imminently overturn Roe v Wade. She was unimpressed with judges who defend such judgments by identifying themselves as constitutional originals. “If you take the original Constitution [as it is and apply it]many people will lose their rights, including all women,” she said, as well as “people who do not own property.”

Later that day, Emily St. John Mandel spoke about her 2014 book station eleven, which has been widely described as prophetic for its portrayal of characters struggling with a world ravaged by a deadly flu pandemic. She said she never considered her most famous novel a “pandemic book”. Instead, she explained, she wanted to write about a “post-technological society”, and “to have a post-technological society, you have to end the world”.

As the literary festival unfolds against the backdrop of several major New Mexico wildfires, including the largest in state history, author and conservationist William deBuys and Roshi Joan Halifax, social activist and Buddhist teacher, participated in an inspiring panel on the difficult topic of: “Where do we go from here?”. DeBuys, Pulitzer Prize finalist and author of ten books including The trail to Kanjiroba, addressed the imbalance of how communities, like those he visited in the Upper Dolpo region of Nepal, were bearing the direct effects of the climate crisis, but had done little to create the emissions. who caused it. “I think one of the few reasonable responses is to simply allow this knowledge to help you continue to seek structural violence in the world you inhabit, and to work to change it and be aware of yourself. in your positioning with this structural violence and try not to participate in it,” he said. “You can’t completely get away with it, that’s really how the world works. But it’s something that we can all strive to change.”

The day was closed by legal thriller author John Grisham, who entertained the audience with stories of lawyers gone wrong while keeping the political edge of the day by discussing his work with The Innocence Project. Speaking of efforts to overturn the many miscarriages of justice that occur within the US justice system, Grisham pointed out, “It’s easy enough to send an innocent man to jail, but it’s next to impossible to get one out.”

The festival is set to continue on Sunday with appearances by The iron Throne designer George RR Martin, Lost Children Archive author Valeria Luiselli and American Poet Laureate Joy Harjo.

The Independent, as the event’s international media partner, provides coverage of each day of the festival with exclusive interviews with some of the key writers. To learn more about the festival, visit our Santa Fe Literary Festival Chapter or visit the the festival website.

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