Buddhist writing – Gurugama http://gurugama.org/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 16:55:37 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 http://gurugama.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/favicon-16.png Buddhist writing – Gurugama http://gurugama.org/ 32 32 Sacred texts of major world religions http://gurugama.org/sacred-texts-of-major-world-religions/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 15:51:58 +0000 http://gurugama.org/sacred-texts-of-major-world-religions/ The sacred texts are extremely important for the followers of the religion. They guide adherents on how to live and act, and also serve as records of religious history. There are several types of sacred writings, including scriptures, holy books, canons, and apocrypha. Each type varies slightly in content and purpose, but all act as […]]]>

The sacred texts are extremely important for the followers of the religion. They guide adherents on how to live and act, and also serve as records of religious history. There are several types of sacred writings, including scriptures, holy books, canons, and apocrypha. Each type varies slightly in content and purpose, but all act as an authoritative guide for religious followers.

Baha’i

Text from a Tablet of Baháʼu’lláh, rendered calligraphically by Mishkín-Qalam

The Bahá’í religion grew out of the teachings of Bahá’u’lláh, who was born in the early 18th century and was an Iranian nobleman who claimed to be the divinely ordained successor of the Prophet Muhammad. He taught that all religions are part of God’s plan for the spiritual development of mankind and that there is an underlying reality that unites all faiths. The sacred texts of the Bahá’í religion include the Quran, the holy book of Islam; the Bible; and the writings of Baha’u’llah.

Buddhism

Buddhist monks reading the scriptures
A young Buddhist monk reading a holy book in a monastery.

Buddhism was founded by Siddhartha Gautama, also known as the Buddha, in the Iron Age. It is based on the teachings of the Buddha and those of his disciples. The Buddha lived and taught in the northeastern Indian subcontinent and died in Kushinagar. Buddhism has played an important role in the history of Asia. Sacred texts are an important part of the religion, providing guidance and teachings to followers. There are many types of Buddhist scriptures, each with its own purpose. The most famous Buddhist scripture is the Diamond Sutra, a collection of the Buddha’s sermons. Buddhists use this text as a guide to help them live their lives in accordance with the Buddha’s teachings. Other important Buddhist scriptures include the Lotus Sutra, a collection of the Buddha’s wisdom, and the Heart Sutra, a summary of the main points of Buddhist doctrine. Buddhists use these texts to better understand their religion.

Christianity

Bible in church
A Bible in a church.

Christians believe in one God who revealed himself through the sacred texts. Christians divide them into two parts, the Old Testament and the New Testament. The Old Testament is the Hebrew Bible that Christians consider to be divinely inspired. The New Testament is a collection of 27 books, including the Gospels, Acts, and letters from various early Christian leaders. Christians regard these texts as sacred writings or the word of God. Sacred texts are an important part of the Christian faith because they provide guidance and insight into God’s will. Christians believe that by reading and studying the Bible, they can better understand the mind and heart of God. Sacred texts also play an important role in worship, as they are often used in preaching and teaching.

Hinduism

Hindu monk reading the scriptures
A Hindu monk reading the scriptures near a temple along a river.

Hinduism was founded in India and is the oldest religion in the world. Sacred texts include the Vedas and Upanishads, as well as the Bhagavad Gita. These texts are sacred writings that contain Hindu teachings, laws and philosophies. Hindus believe in reincarnation and karma. This means that a person’s soul goes through a cycle of birth, life, death and rebirth. Good deeds and bad deeds determine how the soul is reborn. Hindus also believe in Dharma, which is to live according to cosmic law and order. Sanatana Dharma is the eternal way of life. This is the path that leads to the liberation of rebirth. Hinduism aims to achieve Moksha, which is liberation from the cycle of rebirth and reunion with the divine.

Islam

Quran in the mosque
The Holy Quran in a mosque.

Islam is a religion that began in the 7th century with the Prophet Muhammad. It is the second largest religion in the world, with over 1.6 billion followers. The word Islam means submission to God. Muslims believe that there is only one God and that Muhammad is his messenger. Holy texts for Muslims include the Quran, which is considered the word of God, and the Hadith, which is an account of the words and actions of Muhammad.

Jainism

Jain scriptures
A Jain devotee reads scriptures before making votive offerings of rice during the Caturmas festival of Jainism.

Jainism was founded in ancient India by Vardhamana Jnatiputra. Jainism teaches that the universe is eternal and every living thing has an immortal soul. The most sacred texts are the Agam Sutras, a collection of scriptures. These scriptures contain the teachings of the Jain Tirthankaras, who are considered enlightened beings. Other sacred texts include the scriptures of the Digambara and Svetambara sects of Jainism. Jains do not believe in a personal god. Instead, they worship the Tirthankaras, who are enlightened beings who have attained liberation from the cycle of birth and death.

Judaism

torah judaism
A Jewish boy reading the Torah.

Judaism teaches that there is one God who created and rules the world. The Jews are His chosen people charged with representing Him in the world and bringing His message of ethical monotheism to all mankind. Sacred texts include the Torah (the five books of Moses), the prophets and the writings. The Talmud is a central text of Rabbinic Judaism and is studied by all Jews.

Sikhism

Guru Granth Sahib
Sikh priest reading the Guru Granth Sahib (Sikh holy book). Editorial credit: Sumit Saraswat / Shutterstock.com

Sikhism was founded in the 15th century by Guru Nanak. It is a monotheistic religion that believes in one God and teaches the equality of all humans. The sacred texts of Sikhism are the Sri Guru Granth Sahib, which is the sacred scripture of the Sikh Gurus, and the Dasam Granth, which is a collection of writings by Guru Gobind Singh.

taoism

taoism
The yin yang is a symbolic representation of the polarities of the world and is important in Taoism.

Taoism is a religion that worships the Tao, or followers of the “Way” believe in following the Tao to achieve harmony with the natural world. The Tao is considered the driving force behind all things, so Taoists seek to live by following it. This may involve practices such as meditation, feng shui, or acupuncture. The sacred texts of Taoism include the Tao Te Ching and the Zhuangzi. The Tao Te Ching is a sacred scripture that contains the teachings of Lao Tzu, the founder of Taoism. The Zhuangzi is another scripture that includes instructions from Zhuang Zhou, a disciple of Lao Tzu.

Zoroastrianism

fire temple
A Zoroastrian Ateshgah fire temple in Azerbaijan.

Zoroastrianism believes in one God, Ahura Mazda, and the seven immortal saints called Amesha Spenta. Sacred texts include the Avesta, a collection of sacred writings, and the Gathas, hymns composed by Zoroaster himself. The religion of Zoroastrianism has three central principles: good thoughts, good words and good deeds. Zoroastrians are also required to perform certain rituals, such as prayer and fasting, and to participate in the six seasonal festivals.

Most religions have sacred texts which are considered sacred writings. Sacred texts are important for religion because they guide believers. They can also be a source of comfort and inspiration. Sacred texts can be used to settle disputes and teach new generations about the beliefs of the religion. In short, sacred texts are essential to the practice of any religion.

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What Goa lost, for no good reason http://gurugama.org/what-goa-lost-for-no-good-reason/ Fri, 11 Nov 2022 20:29:01 +0000 http://gurugama.org/what-goa-lost-for-no-good-reason/ November 12, 2022 | 06:45 IST DD Kosambi Ideas Festival: What Goa lost, for no good reason I feel terribly disappointed, said Damodar Mauzo; the official explanation does not appear to be the real reason, Prof Madhavi Menon said; canceling a dialogue is never successful. I have always found myself on the side of dialogue […]]]>
November 12, 2022 | 06:45 IST

DD Kosambi Ideas Festival: What Goa lost, for no good reason

I feel terribly disappointed, said Damodar Mauzo; the official explanation does not appear to be the real reason, Prof Madhavi Menon said; canceling a dialogue is never successful. I have always found myself on the side of dialogue and communication, said Dr Suraj Yengde

By Vivek Menezes for O Heraldo

Govind Gaude is not responsible for the shocking and shameful cancellation of this week’s DD Kosambi Festival of Ideas, but that is the only thing certain about this shameful debacle. We also know – because it’s obvious – that this dynamic young minister was forced to pull the plug at the very last minute, even after the invitations had been circulated, but the who and why are entirely obscure, none of the speculation does not make logical sense. It is deeply tragic that after several years of disappointment, this year’s edition was uniformly superb, meaning Goa lost something truly significant for no good reason.

“I feel terribly disappointed,” said Damodar Mauzo, winner of the Jnanpith Prize 2022, who was not only to open the Festival of Ideas, but who also played the crucial role in the selection committee (of which I was also a member). .

“It’s not just because I couldn’t give my talk (which I had spent days preparing, and I believe others did too), but because I contributed to persuade other speakers to accept our invitations,” said Mauzo.

“On a personal note, my family members had bought tickets to attend, and I myself turned down two other invitations to prestigious events in Trivandrum and Mumbai to be here. It was absolutely shocking to learn of the cancellation, which unnecessarily tarnished the reputation of our state,” the Jnanpith award winner said.

Professor Madhavi Menon of Ashoka University was to speak after Mauzo, on The Law of Desire, which is also the title of his most recent book.

“I was very saddened by the cancellation. The official explanation didn’t seem to be the real reason. And if the real reason, as reported by the press, is the choice of speakers, then that’s very sad. J ‘was, and am, proud to have been included, and all of us are, I would like to think, not only intellectually rigorous, but also ethically committed to the cause of intellectual debate and critical inquiry,’ said the Professor Menon.

“Calling these traits undesirable is not appropriate for an event dedicated to culture, especially on behalf of such a brilliant thinker as DD Kosambi. Diversity is essential for survival. Intellectual debates are crucial for a democracy. And thinking differently is a skill to cultivate. Goa has for so long been a haven of understanding. I hope it will be the same in the future,” she said.

Dr Devdutt Pattanaik, a hugely popular bestselling author and illustrator of over 50 books, intended to talk about the spectacular diversity of the gods of Goa – “the various deities from Sateri to Mangesh to Betal” – and goes from ahead to do so via Instagram Live today at 5pm (@devduttmyth).

“I was surprised at the cancellation until I realized that there are some crazies who blocked the project. But I will still use the internet to share this interesting topic. Saraswati is free to roam everywhere – in Delhi and Goa too,” he said.

Each of the speakers scheduled for this year’s “Festival of Ideas” are stellar luminaries, bar none. However, Goa’s biggest loss is failing to listen to Dr. Suraj Yengde.

This brilliant young scholar and public intellectual – who is also said to have rekindled Kosambi’s connection to Harvard – has been thinking and working hard to understand and contextualize Goa, for several months in anticipation.

“The invitation allowed me to engage in the history of Goa and I even went to Portugal to better understand this paradigm. I was going to trace the lineage of Kosambis via the father, the great Dharmanand, an erudite scholar of the Sanskrit and Buddhist India. Until this invitation came, I did not pay attention to the Goa part of their history, but then I started to think about the Goa particularity of this history,” he said. -he declares.

Yengde said, “I was also going to invoke the hallways the Kosambis and I share at Harvard, and the libraries where they must have conducted their research and writings. Then I would delve into the issue at hand, the caste system and its flaws.

“The question of the evolutionary nature of caste and what that means for the materiality and spirit of a tradition must fade as a prolegomena of modernity takes shape. I would have presented case studies and research findings on caste, especially in India but in some parts of the world – this was the first time I discussed the upcoming book project in depth. The only other place where I presented this new research was Stanford earlier this year,” the famed researcher said.

It is extremely frustrating to see and hear Yengde’s enthusiasm for Goa, which he can no longer share on the state’s first intellectual platform: “I was introduced to writings and voices phenomenal like the scintillating poetry of Vishnu Wagh, the history of backward caste communities through The Work of Paresh Parobo, the exile of the Gomantak Maratha Samaj and the new era of Goan scholarship cutting the ceiling with Anjali Aarondekar, young Kaustubh Naik and Angela Barreto Xavier,” he said.

“I developed an affectionate friendship with certain writers from Goa whose love of literature and taste for genres were reciprocated. I was going to try to reinsert the scientific importance of Kosambi in caste studies, does not occupy a seminal role. He is treated with many prefixes, which sometimes works against a polymath. I will come and always do the above,” he said.

“I want to learn and grow by spending time with the brilliant minds of Goa and people in general. I wanted to make Goa accessible to the underlings of India who do not see this space as theirs,” added Dr Yengde.

Some people assume that Dr. Yengde is the reason why “the powers that be” suddenly got cold feet, but that would be particularly absurd: “Since I received the invitation, I have shared with many colleagues Goa government had invited me, and some raised a disappointed eyebrow because of the ruling party. This is precisely what I wanted to say to them: canceling a dialogue is never fruitful,” he said. he declares.

“I have always found myself on the side of dialogue and communication. Goa is different, I insisted. When they shared with BJP friends at the center, they wanted to come down to watch this event.

“After the news of the postponement, they sent me a message asking if I was still coming. A senior BJP official invited me to his state and offered me a meeting with the central leadership of the party later this month,” he said.

The final speaker this year was going to be Pranay Lal, the award-winning author whose Indica: A Deep Natural History of the Indian Subcontinent is one of the most treasured books of our 21st century.

“I was shocked by the cancellation as I did not expect a government supported event to be cancelled. But I have been dealing with pushbacks for some time. I have been thrown a chappal at a university when I mentioned species labels derived from names of Indian gods (Vishnufelis an extinct cat, Ramapithecus an extinct ape from the Siwaliks, which is actually named after Ramnagar where the first fossil was discovered). It is sad that academia has become callous and mean-spirited,” Lal said.

Lal said: “The Kosambi family has been instrumental in critical thinking, raising wonderful questions and presenting elegant theses on various aspects of science, mathematics, history, genetics, linguistics, ethnography and other disciplines.

“I actually felt nervous when the organizers asked me to speak at the festival because DD Kosambi Sahab was a revolutionary thinker and an incendiary intellectual. It is sad that the Festival of Ideas that bears his name has been canceled , because the Kosambi family embodied a culture where ideas flourished.

“I hope that the people of Goa will stay in a space that will promote openness and protect the arts, science and free thought, and that books or paintings or indeed works of scholarship will be kept for posterity. I hope this is a one-time event and that intellectual freedom and the liberties of free-spirited individuals will be restored,” he said.

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What is Soft Buddhism? | Satya Robyn http://gurugama.org/what-is-soft-buddhism-satya-robyn/ Tue, 08 Nov 2022 09:42:10 +0000 http://gurugama.org/what-is-soft-buddhism-satya-robyn/ Photo by Kaspa Thompson What is it about? What is Gentle Buddhism and what qualifies me to talk about it? I’ll tell you, but first I want to describe the view from my window. I live with my wife on the ground floor of our Buddhist temple, and just outside is our vegetable garden – […]]]>

Photo by Kaspa Thompson

What is it about?

What is Gentle Buddhism and what qualifies me to talk about it? I’ll tell you, but first I want to describe the view from my window. I live with my wife on the ground floor of our Buddhist temple, and just outside is our vegetable garden – now a mess of gone-to-seed spinach, old zucchini plants and a scattering of shiny poppies. Beyond the vegetable garden wall is a wide expanse of valley – at this moment the mist is gathering in the hollows and I can see the faint silhouettes of trees and hills emerging from the white.

I’ll start in the valley – the skeins of mist, the translucent petals of the poppy – because that’s where I’m happiest. I’m happiest when I forget about Buddhism, soft or not, and relax into my day – face all that happens with curiosity, courage, compassion and gratitude.

Unfortunately, I am not always full of these qualities. Sometimes I’m restless, or full of voices criticizing me or telling me I’m not enough. Sometimes I get overwhelmed with compulsions — eating cake or scrolling on social media. As I was typing that paragraph, I just had to get up and leave one of my dogs outside, then the other, then they both wanted to come inside. Then Ralph wanted to sit in the same chair as Aiko, and I had to mediate their little quarrel. I noticed that impatience rose in me like mercury in a thermometer.

How to be enlightened…

Dogen, the 13the Century Zen Master, told us that to be enlightened by the ten thousand things, we must begin by studying ourselves. The Buddhist teachings offer us many wonderful ways to learn about ourselves, and that’s what I will write about in this blog – aided by my experience with the model I use as a psychotherapist – internal family systems. How can we become more friendly with the different parts of ourselves? How to discover their motivations and help them loosen their iron grip?

For decades, I trained pretty hard. It paid off – I wrote ten books, ran a successful mindful writing business, worked with several hundred psychotherapy clients, and ran a Buddhist temple with my wife Kaspa for eight years. I have very high standards for myself and can find it hard to take breaks or have fun. I approached Buddhism in the same way, seeing it as a serious and ongoing project – reading hundreds of books, completing years of study, feeling guilty when I don’t practice “enough” or when I don’t am not a ‘good Buddhist’.

I’m done pushing. It doesn’t help me, and it doesn’t help anyone else either – because I carry my stress with me like a force field and inflict it on those around me. I don’t think I’m the only one to approach Buddhism in this “fiery” way. These messages are embedded in our capitalist and colonialist culture and, of course, they will also infect our interpretation of Buddhism. If we just did more meditation, if we just did more retreats, if we could just be more generous or patient or compassionate, then everything would work out! Is that okay? What is “sufficient” Buddhist practice? What if we couldn’t be more generous? What if we are overwhelmed by feelings of jealousy, self-pity, or rage? Then what ?

To the glory of sweetness

I believe that if we can approach our lives and our Buddhist practice with gentleness, we will not only feel better, but we will also become nicer people. If we can stop blaming ourselves, we will be less likely to blame or criticize others. If we can be more honest about our limitations, we’ll stop over-promising and letting others down. If we can forgive ourselves, we will be more able to forgive others. If we can heal what needs healing within ourselves, we will be more available to help others. We live in a time of great suffering – war, pandemic, economic crisis, climate and ecological emergency. We need bodhisattvas more than ever. In my experience, the quickest way to bodhisattva is to go slowly.

I feel excited about this journey into Soft Buddhism. Did the Buddha talk a lot about gentleness? And those who followed him? What does my own tradition, Pure Land Buddhism, have to offer? What about other Buddhist traditions? What are my daily experiences of Gentle Buddhism, and what are yours?

For now, it’s time to finish this writing and look out my window again for a while. The mist is still there, but the sun is diluting it and I can see more of the trees, the fields and the little houses. I can feel a new relaxation in my body as I watch – a deep recognition of my ordinary being and the relief of being acceptable as I am. Maybe I’ll sit down with a cup of tea before I go upstairs to clean the sanctuary room. Maybe I’m finally learning the way of gentleness.

I hope you will come with me.

go slow ��


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Vermont Arts News | Vermont Arts http://gurugama.org/vermont-arts-news-vermont-arts/ Sat, 05 Nov 2022 04:00:00 +0000 http://gurugama.org/vermont-arts-news-vermont-arts/ Eleva Chamber Players WATERBURY-WAITFIELD — The Eleva Chamber Players are celebrating the legacy of violinist John Lindsey, its founding concertmaster, as he retires from the orchestra after 17 years. The farewell concerts feature some of the most beloved pieces from the string repertoire: Corelli’s Concerto grosso in G minor, Op. 6, no. 8 (“The Christmas […]]]>

Eleva Chamber Players

“A place to start”

modern day theater

“Silent Sky”

‘A little night music’

Youth author and illustrator

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50 Best Vietnam War Movies Of All Time, Ranked http://gurugama.org/50-best-vietnam-war-movies-of-all-time-ranked/ Sat, 29 Oct 2022 17:00:00 +0000 http://gurugama.org/50-best-vietnam-war-movies-of-all-time-ranked/ In 1968, best friends Mike, Steven, and Nick (Robert De Niro, Christopher Walken, and John Savage, respectively) are drafted into the United States Army. Sent to fight in Vietnam, the three are soon captured by the Viet Cong, enduring torturous games that leave them physically and emotionally scarred. Back in their little Pennsylvania, each of […]]]>

In 1968, best friends Mike, Steven, and Nick (Robert De Niro, Christopher Walken, and John Savage, respectively) are drafted into the United States Army. Sent to fight in Vietnam, the three are soon captured by the Viet Cong, enduring torturous games that leave them physically and emotionally scarred. Back in their little Pennsylvania, each of them realizes how drastically their lives have changed and that none of them will ever be the same again.

Like many Vietnam War films, “The Deer Hunter” follows a group of young men as they undergo a drastic change due to their Vietnam War experiences. Divided into three sections, we see these men in their daily lives before their war, their time in Vietnam, and what life after the war is like. As we see, it’s a startling transformation, symbolizing the deep transformation of soldiers from good-natured youths to traumatized veterans unable to readapt to civilian life.

“The Deer Hunter” was considered one of the defining films of the 1970s, earning praise for its realism, maturity, and the performances of its cast. Winner of Best Picture, Best Director and Best Supporting Actor (Walken), it was named one of the best films of all time by Empire and The New York Times. “This film has qualities we hardly see anymore – range, power and expansive experience, all fully supported throughout three hours of film that leave us exhausted and satisfied by the end,” said David Denby from New York Magazine.

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World Heritage in Danger label, ASI urges Bihar government for Nalanda protection plan http://gurugama.org/world-heritage-in-danger-label-asi-urges-bihar-government-for-nalanda-protection-plan/ Tue, 18 Oct 2022 08:00:59 +0000 http://gurugama.org/world-heritage-in-danger-label-asi-urges-bihar-government-for-nalanda-protection-plan/ The Archeological Survey of India (ASI) has requested the government of Bihar to promptly submit its conservation plan for Nalanda Mahavihara to maintain World Heritage Site status for the remains of the ancient center of learning. If the integrated master plan, which has been in preparation for a long time, and its compliance reports […]]]>

The Archeological Survey of India (ASI) has requested the government of Bihar to promptly submit its conservation plan for Nalanda Mahavihara to maintain World Heritage Site status for the remains of the ancient center of learning.

If the integrated master plan, which has been in preparation for a long time, and its compliance reports are not submitted to the Paris-based World Heritage Center (WHC) within the stipulated deadline, Nalanda Mahavihara risks being removed from the coveted World Heritage List. World Heritage Site, an ISA official said here.

The WHC is the coordinator within UNESCO for all matters related to World Heritage.

“The commitment regarding the submission of the Integrated Master Plan for the Protection and Preservation of Nalanda Mahavihara made at the time of inscription of this site on the UNESCO World Heritage List must be respected,” said Goutami Bhattacharya, ASI Chief Archaeologist, Patna Circle. PTI.

Despite repeated reminders from ASI in recent months, Nalanda district administration has not submitted the integrated master plan to ASI, she claimed.

Nalanda was an acclaimed Mahavihara, a large Buddhist monastery, in the ancient kingdom of Magadha in modern Bihar. The site is located about 95 kilometers southeast of Patna. It was a center of learning from the fifth century CE to 1200 CE.

The excavated remains of Nalanda were inscribed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 2016.

“Failure to submit the Integrated Master Plan on time may compel the World Heritage Committee to adopt a negative position,” the ASI official said.

If the WHC adopts a negative opinion regarding a monument, it is placed on the endangered species list, which results in the automatic revocation of World Heritage status, Bhattacharya said.

“It will be very embarrassing for a country. To avoid such situations, I have been constantly writing letters to Nalanda District Magistrate to submit the integrated master plan at the earliest,” she said.

The CPM meeting in this regard will probably be held the first week of December.

Bhattacharya said she wrote the last letter to the deputy minister on the matter on October 17.

The same letter was also sent to the principal secretaries of arts, culture and youth and the urban development and housing departments of the state government.

Despite repeated attempts by the PTI, Nalanda District Magistrate Shashank Shubhankar was unavailable for comment.

Bandana Preyashi, secretary of the arts, culture and youth department, could also not be reached.

“One of the commitments to the World Heritage Center in relation to the excavated remains of Nalanda Mahavihara was the diversion of the road linking National Highway 80 and 110 (which passes between the site and the museum). An alternative route should be identified to regulate vehicular traffic and thus minimize any negative impact on the site due to pollution.

“Similarly, congestion at the front door by peddlers is an ongoing problem that does not seem to have been resolved at all,” Bhattacharya said.

The excavated site includes stupas, shrines, viharas (residential and educational buildings) and important works of art in stucco, stone and metal.

(This story has not been edited by the Devdiscourse team and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

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Firebrand Theater Company: Podcasts go behind the banknote to tell Nan Shepherd’s story http://gurugama.org/firebrand-theater-company-podcasts-go-behind-the-banknote-to-tell-nan-shepherds-story/ Sun, 16 Oct 2022 04:06:21 +0000 http://gurugama.org/firebrand-theater-company-podcasts-go-behind-the-banknote-to-tell-nan-shepherds-story/ IN 2016, writer Nan Shepherd made history by becoming the first woman to appear on a Scottish banknote. Yet despite the recognition, she still strikes a mysterious figure – an enigma who dressed as a primary schoolteacher but enjoyed bathing naked in mountain tarns; a woman who lived single but had a love affair with […]]]>

IN 2016, writer Nan Shepherd made history by becoming the first woman to appear on a Scottish banknote.

Yet despite the recognition, she still strikes a mysterious figure – an enigma who dressed as a primary schoolteacher but enjoyed bathing naked in mountain tarns; a woman who lived single but had a love affair with a mysterious man, and a best-selling author who apparently gave up her writing after just three novels, despite being hailed as Scotland’s Virginia Woolf and compared to Thomas Hardy.

She was also one of the first British writers whose work was influenced by Buddhist and Eastern philosophy, but was so ahead of her time that it was only in recent years that her writing really took off – so much so that his book The Living Mountain has been translated into 16 languages ​​and inspired a tour by Icelandic singer Bjork.

So who is the woman behind the image on the banknote? It’s a riddle tackled by the Borders-based Firebrand Theater Company, who have made three podcasts about it in association with the Pitlochry Festival Theater and can be listened to for free on October 24, November 21 and January 30.

“We wanted to see if we could meet Nan the Woman in person, dramatizing her in a podcast series that we could eventually turn into a play,” said Firebrand director Richard Baron. “When we did our research we found an exceptional woman who rather belied the glamorous portrayal on the note. She was someone who had lived in a small village in Aberdeenshire for most of her life and who had yet written three very extraordinary feminist modernist novels in the late 1920s and 1930s, but which were forgotten and out of print for most of her life.

READ MORE: The Forgotten Scottish Woman’s Attempt to End US Slavery

Although her novels were critically acclaimed, Baron said the problem was that her publishers were English and based in London.

“She liked using Doric in her books because she thought it was extremely expressive and imaginative, but the English editors didn’t really understand some of the language she was using,” Baron said. “Her novel The Quarry Wood was eventually published with a glossary at the end with all the ‘foreign’ Scottish words, which she considered ridiculous and unnecessary.”

This, and an extremely poor review from Sunset Song author Lewis Grassic Gibbon, may have dissuaded Shepherd from writing, Baron thinks. The theory is that Grassic Gibbon felt she was walking her plot because her work was set in a similar location with a female lead character and similar use of dialect.

“He may have seen her as a rival even though Sunset Song came out after the first two of his novels,” Baron said. “She seems to have largely stopped writing fiction soon after. I don’t think she was that confident in her work and the review might have put her off.

His most famous book now is the non-fiction The Living Mountain which was written during World War II but did not see the light of day until 1977 when Shepherd was over 80.

Baron believes her love affair with a mysterious man (who he claims was her best friend’s husband) and The Living Mountain, a hymn to the high hills of Scotland, were linked.

“She immersed herself in nature and found a new way to express her love and come to terms with herself in the mountains,” Baron said. “She doesn’t delve deeply into Eastern philosophy, but she was certainly influenced by it.

READ MORE: Critically acclaimed show tells story of gender transition

“She bathed naked in the tarns, walked barefoot in the heather and loved to sleep on the mountains. She sees her relationship with the mountain as an experience of friendship, which is a nice way to express it.

Shepherd showed the manuscript to a single London publisher who rejected it so she put it in a drawer where it sat for years. Doubts led her to self-publish the book in 1977, but it has only recently become famous, especially during pandemic shutdowns.

“One of the great things about the book’s philosophy is that it’s good for mental health and has interested people all over the world, including Bjork who did a concert tour based on it” , Baron said.

“Nan was truly a woman ahead of her time. She was also a very passionate but unconventional teacher – much like a main character in Miss Jean Brodie. She loved Scottish literature and one of the things she wanted her students to understand was that Scotland had literature and it was important for them to read it.

For free tickets to A Journey With Nan Shepherd, visit www.pitlochryfestivaltheatre.com and www.firebrandtheatre.co.uk

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New Holy and Disappointing Stories of George Saunders: A Soft-Hearted Dismantling http://gurugama.org/new-holy-and-disappointing-stories-of-george-saunders-a-soft-hearted-dismantling/ Thu, 13 Oct 2022 16:14:29 +0000 http://gurugama.org/new-holy-and-disappointing-stories-of-george-saunders-a-soft-hearted-dismantling/ On the bookshelf Liberation Day: Stories By George SaundersRandom house: 256 pages, $28 If you purchase linked books from our site, The Times may earn a commission from Bookshop.org, whose fees support independent bookstores. Every saint is guilty until proven guilty, said George Orwell. This is bad news for George Saunders, who is probably as […]]]>

On the bookshelf

Liberation Day: Stories

By George Saunders
Random house: 256 pages, $28

If you purchase linked books from our site, The Times may earn a commission from Bookshop.org, whose fees support independent bookstores.

Every saint is guilty until proven guilty, said George Orwell. This is bad news for George Saunders, who is probably as close to a living candidate for canonization as American literature. Saunders isn’t just a major author in the eyes of critics and readers — his only novel, “Lincoln in the Bardo,” appeared at No. 1 on the New York Times bestseller list, territory of James Patterson. — but a revered professor of creative writing at Syracuse University, the deliverer of a brilliant and slightly boring viral debut talk about kindness and a practicing buddhist.

How to take up arms against this range of virtues! A scathing review would be the easiest way. Let’s see what we can do.

The book that propelled Saunders to widespread fame was his marvelous 2013 collection of stories “December 10.” It seems there to push the fiction abruptly in the direction of the 21st century, depicting humans as they passed through overwhelming modernities. The stories were not only clever and wise but funny, that rarest quality in short fiction. He followed it with “Lincoln in the Bardo,” about Abraham Lincoln amid the Civil War’s fiercest fighting, mourning his son in a graveyard full of loud-mouthed, ancient ghosts. He won the Booker Prize. Now he has released a new collection of stories, “Liberation Day.”

Saunders often starts in the media, disorienting us with a strange language that resolves, ultimately, into sad clarity. (I suspect the technique derives from fantasy novels — whether or not that’s true, those muddles were another way “Tenth of December” so successfully mimicked the feeling of being alive after the turn of the millennium.)

And so it may in fact sound familiar to Saunders readers when, a few lines into the title story and the opening of the new book, the narrator cheerfully says, “One can be thrown off balance before the eyes of others upset and brought into a rather punitive area. (Here at the Untermeyers, a shed in the yard.)” This combination – confusing futuristic lingo punctuated by the prosaic fact of a garden shed – is quintessential Saunders.

As the story, almost a novella in length, continues, Saunders hits many of its old marks, invoking Custer, the ethics of AI, the shaky myopia of the adult children of the rich, the varieties of actors that we all perform. There is a startling violence and, in the character of an unloved housewife who seeks solace from one of the creatures (“Pinioned”), an unexpected pathos. There’s also careful consideration of two of the author’s most recurring themes: freedom from confinement and moral hazard. In other words, “Liberation Day” picks up where “December 10” left off.

But the supercollider settings just seem wrong this time. Saunders’ level of writing remains astronomically high, but suddenly there are slippages. In the title story, for example, the narrator combines a robot’s orotund diction with little comets of slang, “super nice”, “killing”, in a way more fabricated than anything in “Tenth of December “. “What’s great? he asks later. “That is what my heart yearns to ask. What is lush? What’s bold, what’s bold? In which direction is the maximum of wealth, abundance, delight? It’s beautiful writing, but in context it seems detached from the narrative, as if the author’s moral concerns had begun to precede his concerns as a writer.

Perhaps Saunders is partly a victim of his own influence; all the stories previously published here have appeared in the New Yorker, and sometimes they feel like all the New Yorker stories do now: confident, current, sad. And it’s worth repeating that even a bad Saunders story is good in many ways: all nine of this ultra-readable book contain impulses of wit and beauty, great unexpected lines, sudden laughs.

Indeed, in two of them, “Mother’s Day” and “A Thing At Work”, he reaches the heights of his previous fiction. The best of the collection is the first, about two terrible, self-righteous mothers mentally attacking each other from across the street (“Did she just live her life, mean like everyone else? “) before a hailstorm offered them a chance at redemption. Like Roberto Bolaño and Alice Munro, two other masters of the form, Saunders loves the short story’s ability to expand time, to show the newlywed as a knowing old woman won over by loss. What if your choices were wrong? What if you weren’t exactly the victim you thought you were? It is unequaled to leave such questions in the reader’s mind.

But the rest of “Liberation Day” is less powerful, as if the convulsive quality that makes art great has diminished. Instead, there are plenty of tender, extremely well-written passages about the harshness of life. And of course, life is tough, awful, and tough, and Saunders is justified in continually pursuing this subject to its roots. It turns out, I think, that holiness is real. “I want to meet the heart that is breaking on the other side of the world”, as Simone de Beauvoir said about Simone Weil.

What has fallen a bit are the stories that convey this message. The problem is that morality and art have nothing to do with each other. As in his earlier work, Saunders’ relentlessly human view of life, always comically searching for our deepest negations of each other, is remarkably vivid. But his innovations as an artist turned into repetitions; and genius is an erratic visitor.

Finch’s novels include the mysteries of Charles Lenox.

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Pictures of Hindu gods thrown into the river in front of Buddha Dharma Deeksha in K’taka http://gurugama.org/pictures-of-hindu-gods-thrown-into-the-river-in-front-of-buddha-dharma-deeksha-in-ktaka/ Tue, 11 Oct 2022 06:32:11 +0000 http://gurugama.org/pictures-of-hindu-gods-thrown-into-the-river-in-front-of-buddha-dharma-deeksha-in-ktaka/ House ” To concentrate ” Pictures of Hindu gods thrown into the river in front of Buddha Dharma Deeksha in K’taka Posted By: Gopi October 11, 2022 Yadgir (Karnataka)Oct. 11 (SocialNews.XYZ) An incident of photos of Hindu gods being thrown into the river in front of the Buddha Dharma Deeksha in Yadgir district of Karnataka […]]]>

Yadgir (Karnataka)Oct. 11 (SocialNews.XYZ) An incident of photos of Hindu gods being thrown into the river in front of the Buddha Dharma Deeksha in Yadgir district of Karnataka was reported on Tuesday, sparking controversy.

The Buddha Dharma Deeksha (conversion to Buddhist religion) will be held at Hunasagi near Surapura town in Yadgir district on October 14. The day also marks the “Dhammachakra Pravartan Dina, on which Dr BR Ambedkar, the architect of the Indian constitution, has Hinduism and Buddhism accepted.


The organizers also invited Rama Taayi Ambedkar, Ambedkar’s granddaughter to the event. The program is organized by the Golden Cave Buddha Vihara Trust and Dalit organizations.

A group of people led by Golden Cave Buddha Vihara Trust chairman Venkatesh Hosamani and his aides threw the photos into the river on Monday. The images were kept and revered in his house. They had also taken a video of the act, which went viral on social media, sparking controversy.

Nagaraja Kalladevarahalli, one among the group who threw the photos, said Venkatesh was asked to remove the photos as he was the chairman of the Golden Cave Buddha Vihara Trust. Following this, Venkatesh decided to remove the images of Lakshmi, Venkateshwara, Saraswati and other Hindu gods.

Venkatesh converted to Buddhism on October 14 along with many others. “That’s why we try to forget the Hindu religion and embrace Buddhism,” he argued.

Hindu activists have criticized the act of throwing gods of the Hindu religion into the river. Police have yet to respond to the incident.

Source: IANS

Pictures of Hindu gods thrown into the river in front of Buddha Dharma Deeksha in K'taka

About Gopi

Gopi Adusumilli is a programmer. He is editor of SocialNews.XYZ and president of AGK Fire Inc.

He enjoys designing websites, developing mobile apps and publishing topical news articles from various authenticated news sources.

As for writing, he enjoys writing about current world politics and Indian movies. His future plans include developing SocialNews.XYZ into a news website that has no bias or judgment towards any.

He can be reached at gopi@socialnews.xyz

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Cambodian ‘monks’ arrested for soliciting money in Rayong http://gurugama.org/cambodian-monks-arrested-for-soliciting-money-in-rayong/ Sun, 09 Oct 2022 01:39:59 +0000 http://gurugama.org/cambodian-monks-arrested-for-soliciting-money-in-rayong/ Police arrested five real and fake Cambodian monks in Rayong for illegally entering Thailand and only soliciting alms money. A mix of five real and fake Cambodian monks were arrested and defrocked in Rayong for illegally entering Thailand and only soliciting alms money.On October 7, Klaeng District Officer Kanjarat Eidthongsai led police to Bothong Temple […]]]>
Police arrested five real and fake Cambodian monks in Rayong for illegally entering Thailand and only soliciting alms money.

A mix of five real and fake Cambodian monks were arrested and defrocked in Rayong for illegally entering Thailand and only soliciting alms money.
On October 7, Klaeng District Officer Kanjarat Eidthongsai led police to Bothong Temple where they found a dormitory adorned with Khmer scriptures listing the names of cash donors. More than 10 Khmer monks fled the scene, but five were arrested.

Only two turned out to be real Buddhist priests, identified only as Aon, 34, and Mern. They told the police that they did not have their monk’s license and that they could not remember the name of the Cambodian temple where they had been ordained because they had lived at the Bothong temple for many years.

They worked daily at the Samyan market, taking only alms money, earning around 300 baht a day. Three other unordained Cambodians posed as monks, doing the same. They were taken when Thai buyers were offended by the demand for cash only.

Police tested all five and two tested positive for methamphetamine use. The monks confessed to using some of their alms money to buy drugs.
All were brought before the Deputy Dean of Klaeng District Monks, Phra Khru Kasemattakorn, who defrocked them. The men were later arrested and handed over to immigration police, who charged them with illegal entry into the country and prepared them for deportation.

Police inspect a donation box found in a dormitory at Bothong Temple where the “monks” lived.


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