Buddhist writing – Gurugama http://gurugama.org/ Sat, 01 Jan 2022 07:39:23 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 http://gurugama.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/favicon-16.png Buddhist writing – Gurugama http://gurugama.org/ 32 32 Omicron eases global New Years celebrations, fewer watch ball drops in Times Square http://gurugama.org/omicron-eases-global-new-years-celebrations-fewer-watch-ball-drops-in-times-square/ Sat, 01 Jan 2022 05:01:24 +0000 http://gurugama.org/omicron-eases-global-new-years-celebrations-fewer-watch-ball-drops-in-times-square/ By Daniel Trotta (Reuters) – The Omicron variant of the coronavirus has dampened New Year’s festivities across much of the world, with Paris canceling its fireworks show, London relegating it to television and New York reducing its famous celebration of the fall of bullet in Times Square. The illuminated ball made of Waterford crystal panels […]]]>

By Daniel Trotta

(Reuters) – The Omicron variant of the coronavirus has dampened New Year’s festivities across much of the world, with Paris canceling its fireworks show, London relegating it to television and New York reducing its famous celebration of the fall of bullet in Times Square.

The illuminated ball made of Waterford crystal panels slid down from its poll at midnight in Times Square, but only 15,000 spectators were allowed into the official viewing area instead of the 58,000 usual.

A year ago, the newly available vaccine offered hope that the COVID-19 pandemic could be under control by the start of 2022. Instead, the sudden arrival of Omicron has caused a surge in cases of coronavirus across the world.

Infections around the world have reached an all-time high in the past seven days, with an average of just over one million cases detected per day between December 24 and December 30, up 100,000 from previous peak posted Wednesday, according to Reuters data. Deaths, however, have not increased in kind, giving hope that the new variant is less deadly.

New York City reported a record 44,000 cases on Wednesday and another 43,000 on Thursday, prompting some critics to question whether the celebrations should take place.

But officials have decided that an outdoor party of vaccinated, masked and socially distant revelers was safe and a better option than the virtually vacant celebration that rang in 2021.

“I would be lying if I said I wasn’t worried,” said Sue Park, a Columbia University student who was among 15,000 people allowed to watch in person. “I think it’s really worth coming and celebrating. It will just be more meaningful to be in the crowd.”

Elsewhere in the world, events have been curtailed or canceled altogether, as with the traditional fireworks display over the Petronas Towers in Kuala Lumpur.

Midnight passed in Paris without fireworks or DJ sets planned, while the city authorities canceled the events planned on the Champs-Élysées following the opinion of a scientific panel which declared that the mass gatherings would be too risky.

In the Netherlands, where outdoor gatherings of more than four people are prohibited, police dispersed several thousand people who had gathered suspiciously in Amsterdam’s central Dam Square, the ANP news agency reported.

But in London, where a fireworks display and light show were canceled in October, authorities said on Friday the show would come to life on the TV screen, as Big Ben sounded New Years Eve for the first time. since 2017 after a restoration.

BBC footage of the fireworks showed very light vehicle traffic and virtually no in-person spectators.

Earlier, Britain released a million-case study that found people with Omicron to be about a third more likely to need hospitalization than those with the previously dominant Delta variant. The results were “in line with the encouraging signs we have already seen,” said Susan Hopkins, chief medical adviser at the UK Health Security Agency.

Following encouraging data, Cape Town abruptly lifted the curfew just in time for the New Year, after South Africa became the first country to report its Omicron wave had peaked – and without strong increase in the number of deaths.

South Africa first sounded the alarm about the new variant of the rapidly spreading coronavirus circling the world.

“I just hope Cape Town becomes the old Cape we all knew once again,” said Michael Mchede, manager of a Hard Rock cafe near the white sands of Camps Bay, who was delighted to set the place up. to throw an unexpected party.

Hours earlier, the Australian city of Sydney also celebrated the New Year with something like a full swagger, as spectacular fireworks sparkled in the harbor above the Opera House.

The people of Madrid queued for hours to enter the main square of Puerta del Sol where the celebrations took place with several security checkpoints, mandatory masks and capacity at 60% of normal levels.

Saul Pedrero, a 34-year-old employee, made the trip from Barcelona, ​​which has some of Spain’s tightest controls, including a 1 a.m. curfew.

“It looks like another country. Here you can do everything and nobody says anything,” he said.

A sumptuous fireworks display lit up the festivities, which the Spaniards mark by stuffing 12 grapes in their mouths to accompany each chime of the clock striking midnight.

In Asia, most celebrations have been cut short or canceled. In South Korea, a traditional midnight ringing ceremony was canceled for the second year, while the festivities were banned in Tokyo’s glittering Shibuya entertainment district, and Prime Minister Fumio Kishida took to YouTube. to urge people to wear masks and limit the number at parties.

China, where the coronavirus first appeared in late 2019, was on high alert with the city of Xian closed and New Year’s events in other cities canceled.

(Reporting by Reuters offices; writing by Daniel Trotta; editing by Nick Macfie, Rosalba O’Brien, Chris Reese and Neil Fullick)

Fireworks are seen during New Years celebrations in Times Square, as the Omicron variant of the coronavirus continues to spread, in the Manhattan neighborhood of New York City, the United States, on December 31, 2021. REUTERS / Dieu-Nalio Chery

People attend new year
People attend New Years Eve celebrations in Times Square, as the Omicron variant coronavirus continues to spread, in the Manhattan neighborhood of New York City, the United States on December 31, 2021. REUTERS / Hannah Beier

A light show to mark the New Year is seen above St Paul's Cathedral, amid the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic, in London, Britain on January 1 2022. REUTERS / Toby Melville
A light show to mark the New Year is seen above St Paul’s Cathedral, amid the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic, in London, Britain on January 1 2022. REUTERS / Toby Melville

Fireworks explode in the sky over the Kremlin and St. Basil's Cathedral in the New Year
Fireworks explode in the sky over the Kremlin and St. Basil’s Cathedral during New Year’s Eve celebrations in Moscow, Russia on January 1, 2022. REUTERS / Tatyana Makeyeva

Fireworks explode above the Skyline Building to celebrate New Years in Hong Kong, China on January 1, 2022. REUTERS / Tyrone Siu
Fireworks explode above the Skyline Building to celebrate New Years in Hong Kong, China on January 1, 2022. REUTERS / Tyrone Siu

A staff member wearing a protective mask, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, takes a photo of 6,500 candles as they prepare for a ceremony to wish them over the pandemic and good luck for the upcoming New Year at Hasedera Buddhist Temple in Kamakura, south of Tokyo, Japan on December 31, 2021. REUTERS / Kim Kyung-Hoon
A staff member wearing a protective mask, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, takes a photo of 6,500 candles as they prepare for a ceremony to wish them over the pandemic and good luck for the upcoming New Year at Hasedera Buddhist Temple in Kamakura, south of Tokyo, Japan on December 31, 2021. REUTERS / Kim Kyung-Hoon

(c) Copyright Thomson Reuters 2022. Click for restrictions –
https://agency.reuters.com/en/copyright.html


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Poor Allen Ginsberg | www.splicetoday.com http://gurugama.org/poor-allen-ginsberg-www-splicetoday-com/ Tue, 28 Dec 2021 10:56:16 +0000 http://gurugama.org/poor-allen-ginsberg-www-splicetoday-com/ Allen Ginsberg is often misunderstood by so many people who need labels to define themselves. Without a doubt, he helped propel modern poetry to a wider audience in the 1950s and continued to promote the power and love of poetry throughout his life. No one has done more to celebrate the art of words using […]]]>

Allen Ginsberg is often misunderstood by so many people who need labels to define themselves. Without a doubt, he helped propel modern poetry to a wider audience in the 1950s and continued to promote the power and love of poetry throughout his life. No one has done more to celebrate the art of words using free verse than Ginsberg. Modern poetry owes a certain level of gratitude to “Ginsey”, as poet Beat Gregory Corso affectionately called him.

His story-rich and often controversial career took off in 1956 with the publication of “Howl”, a lengthy indictment against American values. The book was banned shortly after its release, deemed obscene due to references to illegal drugs and both straight and homosexual sex. Despite this, he embraced the protest metaphorically, screaming at socio-political injustice, shedding tears, mourning exploitation, repression and subjugation. The poet asks people to question capitalist propaganda, racial inequalities, totalitarian military conquest and world domination. “Howl” alone is a testament to the birth of the counter-culture movement, and Ginsberg embodies that spirit of the time.

The struggle for freedom continues. As a people and as a nation, it is painfully obvious that we are no better off now than at the start of the Beat Generation. Ginsberg said, “Poetry is the only place people can express their original human spirit. This is an opportunity for people to say in public what is known in private. This quote confirms all forms of poetic social commentary and authentic artistic voice. It also touches on social satire, parables, reality versus fiction, tragicomedy and the path of words.

Although poetry is the highest art, it is most often seen as a professional activity. One of the reasons these truths hold true is that people in power don’t want to be exposed like the frauds they are by a poet. They would lose all validity and their hold over the masses which they avidly exploit. There is little no one can do about the problems we face, but speaking out against them is a start. Ginsberg was a master in this regard. He knew how to manipulate popular opinion, the media and the American Dream Machine against itself, revealing the real nightmare of what it is for most people. He gave voice to those who have no power.

Anyone who criticizes government policies of militarism, perpetual poverty and racism is automatically labeled as unpatriotic or worse. We are witnessing it today. Ginsberg and the generations that followed the Beat aesthetic knew it, but it may already be too late.

There is still a long way to go for all the advancements in legalizing marijuana and even psychedelics. We are still in the infancy of understanding human rights, decency and respect for all humanity. People are not good in this department. Ginsberg and others knew, as early as the Cold War, across Korea, Vietnam, and the Middle East, the lessons of compassion and kindness towards others are lacking. We haven’t learned anything from history. The jumping record is repeated.

With his bravado, charm, and wit, Ginsberg attempted to change the way we think about the world without too much ego. His compassion led him to Buddhism. Of all the major religions, the Buddhist path is the only one which attracts from afar those who also seek the truth and the answers. Some accuse Ginsberg of pedophilia. He was a shameless homosexual and made no secret of it. However, there is no evidence or criminal charges against Ginsberg as a child molester or sex offender. He might be a sexual predator, lusting after young poets half his age, but there is no crime in that. The age of consent is a slippery slope. Lots of wealthy older men pursue teenage girls, and that’s fine in almost all circles, even devout Christians. But a lewd chicken hawk elder preying on young men is unacceptable?


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People talk about – http://gurugama.org/people-talk-about/ Mon, 27 Dec 2021 01:00:00 +0000 http://gurugama.org/people-talk-about/ – the explosion that took place in Karachi claimed the lives of more than a dozen people because decades of haphazard growth and disregard for civic codes created death traps across this vast, cluttered city. People say this disaster needs to be fully investigated as the question arises as to why this building was still […]]]>

– the explosion that took place in Karachi claimed the lives of more than a dozen people because decades of haphazard growth and disregard for civic codes created death traps across this vast, cluttered city. People say this disaster needs to be fully investigated as the question arises as to why this building was still standing even though it was built over a rainwater drain (nullah) while d others, perhaps belonging to less influential people, had been demolished by order of the SC.

– the heartwarming social media outcry over intolerance that took place after a worker at a bakery in the cosmopolitan city of Karachi refused to write “Merry Christmas” on a cake purchased by a customer. People say that discriminating against someone on the basis of their religion is a prejudice.

– the bizarre decision by the management of a medical school in Sindh to remove ceiling fans from girls’ homes because two college students were found hanging from fans after they were allegedly raped. People say that instead of having the matter fully investigated, the administration hushed up the whole incident and decided to move on to live fans, from which bribes will be received, while this alleged cover-up will encourage the perpetrators to continue their brutality on campus. .

– the federal government’s plan to cede control of the education system in Islamabad to the mayor, although they would need to consult education experts and professionals for the improvement of the system. People wonder if the relevant authorities have properly assessed the consequences of this measure given that the mayor is politically appointed and his involvement will only increase political intervention in the education system, further compromising meritocracy.

– statistics on Pakistani prisoners abroad, those condemned to death being quite worrying and which could have been avoided with foresight. People say that while a small percentage of these people have been incarcerated for other crimes, most have been convicted on drug-related charges, so the government and agencies that send citizens abroad for Jobs need to remember that, unlike their home country, drug control in other countries is very strict and carries the death penalty.

– the news that archaeologists have discovered a 2,300-year-old Buddhist temple in Swat. People say that not only must the excavation site be properly protected from narrow-minded vandals, but the items it contains must also be cataloged and kept in a special museum at the site and since Pakistan is a Muslim country with a past Buddhist, but these two are also quite compatible truths that should not be overlooked in appeasing some negative-thinking fanatics who want to deny our historical heritage.

– the report that Pakistan Chief Justice (CJP) Gulzar Ahmed once again nominated LHC Judge Ayesha A. Malik for elevation as Supreme Court justice. People say that even though this proposal was rejected by some judges and lawyers because they said it ignored seniority rules, it would be a good step, if implemented, to promote a positive image of the country and boost the aspirations of women who pursue male-dominated careers. – IH


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Artists, innovators and thinkers who died in 2021 http://gurugama.org/artists-innovators-and-thinkers-who-died-in-2021/ Wed, 22 Dec 2021 21:27:20 +0000 http://gurugama.org/artists-innovators-and-thinkers-who-died-in-2021/ The image goes viral, or as viral as it gets in the summer of 2007. We see the body of a gigantic silver-back mountain gorilla hoisted high on crisscrossing branches and carried by at least 14 men through the bush. The dead gorilla is tied with vines to secure its arms and legs. Its prodigious […]]]>

The image goes viral, or as viral as it gets in the summer of 2007. We see the body of a gigantic silver-back mountain gorilla hoisted high on crisscrossing branches and carried by at least 14 men through the bush. The dead gorilla is tied with vines to secure its arms and legs. Its prodigious belly is also surrounded by vines and its mouth is stuffed with leaves. The photograph seems to be the end of a film whose beginning we do not yet know. It weighs 500 pounds – a black and silver planet in the middle of the green. Although we can’t see this part, some of the men are crying.

The gorilla’s name is Senkwekwe, and he is well known to porters, many of whom are park rangers who call him “brother”. He is the dominant male of a family called the Kabirizis. (The American primatologist Dian Fossey was instrumental in the study of the complex dynamics of these family units.) They are a troop accustomed to humans: gentle, curious, cheerful and often happy to welcome visitors, tourists. and the rangers who protect them. Now, here in their home range, on the slope of the Mikeno volcano in Virunga National Park in eastern Congo, many of them have been murdered by armed militiamen trying to scare the rangers away and take control. from old-growth forest to charcoal. manufacturing. In a solemn procession, the dead gorillas are taken to the rangers field station.

The photograph, taken by Brent Stirton for Newsweek, appears in newspapers and magazines around the world, alerting others to the issues park wardens know so well: the need to protect gorilla habitat, the bloody battle for resources (gold, petroleum, charcoal, tin and poached animals), the destabilizing presence of armed rebel groups as well as the Congolese army within the borders of the park. Although the park is a World Heritage Site, more than 175 park rangers have been killed here over the past 25 years. What is also not visible in this photo is that only one gorilla survives the massacre, a baby found next to its slain mother, one of Senkwekwe’s companions, trying to suckle her breast.

The baby – a 2-month-old, five-pound, adorable female – is dehydrated and near death herself, so a young ranger named Andre Bauma instinctively places her against her bare chest for warmth and comfort and dabs her gums and his tongue with milk. He brings her back to life, sleeps, feeds and plays with her around the clock – for days, then months, then years – until the young gorilla seems convinced that he, Andre Bauma, is his. mother.

André Bauma also seems convinced.

Senkwekwe, Ndakasi’s father, after being found dead in 2007.
Brent Stirton

The baby gorilla, begotten of murdered parents, is called Ndakasi (en-DA-ka-see). Because no orphan mountain gorilla has ever been successfully returned to the wild before, she spends her days in a park sanctuary with a group of other orphan gorillas and their keepers, swinging from the tall branches, munching on wild celery, even learning to finger paint, mostly oblivious to the fact that she lives in one of the most contested places on the planet. She is exuberant and a ham and demands to be carried by her mother, Andre Bauma, even as she grows to 140 pounds and he almost gives way under her weight.

One day in April 2019, another ranger takes a selfie with Ndakasi and her best friend, Ndeze, both standing in the background, one with a protruding stomach and both with whassup expressions. The cheeky blunder on humans is almost too perfect, and the image is posted to Facebook with the caption “Another day at the office. …”

The photo explodes immediately, because we love that stuff – us and them together in one picture. The idea of ​​mountain gorillas imitating us for the camera skips borders and species. We are more alike than different, and it appeals to our imaginations: ourselves existing with a fascinating, perhaps more innocent, version of ourselves.

Mountain gorillas exhibit dozens of vocalizations, and Bauma always vocalizes with Ndakasi singing and growling and the growling belching that signals contentment and security. Whenever there are gunshots near the shrine, Bauma makes sounds to calm Ndakasi. He himself lost his father in the Congo War. Now he tells her it’s just another day in their simple Eden.

“You have to justify why you are on this earth,” Bauma says in a documentary. “The gorillas are the reason why I am here.”

A park warden taking a selfie with Ndakasi and a friend in 2019.
Mathieu Shamavu / Virunga National Park

Ndakasi turns 14 in 2021 and spends his days healing Ndeze, clinging to Bauma, vocalizing with him. Mountain gorillas can live up to 40 years, but one spring day she gets sick. She loses weight, then some of her hair. It is a mysterious disease which increases and decreases, for six months. Vets from an organization called Gorilla Doctors arrive and, during repeated visits, administer a series of medical interventions that appear to make small improvements. Just when it looks like she is going to recover, however, Ndakasi takes a bad turn.

Now his gaze only reaches right in front of her. The wonder and playfulness seem to have faded, her concentration having turned inward. Brent Stirton, who has returned to the Virunga about every 18 months since photographing the massacre of the Ndakasi family, is visiting and taking pictures judiciously. The doctors help Ndakasi to sit down at the table where they are treating her. She vomits into a bucket, is anesthetized. Bauma stays with her all the time; finally, she is taken to her enclosure and lies down on a green sheet. Bauma is lying on the bare floor next to her.

At one point, Bauma leans against the wall, then she crawls onto her knees, with the energy she has left, rests her head on his chest and sinks into him, placing her foot on his foot. “I think that’s when I could almost see the light leaving his eyes,” Stirton said. “It was a private moment no different from being with a dying child. I made five frames with respect and walked out.

One of the latest photographs goes viral, spreading the sad news of Ndakasi’s death to the world. What do we see when we look? Pain. Trial. Death. And we also see great love. Our capacity to receive and to give. It is a fleeting moment of transcendence, a gorilla in its mother’s arms, two creatures united to make one. It’s deeply humbling, which the natural world bestows, if we allow it.

Bauma’s colleagues draw a tight circle around him in order to prevent him from having to talk about Ndakasi’s passing, though he issues a statement praising his “gentle nature and intelligence,” adding: “I loved him. like a child”. Then he goes back to work. Death is everywhere in Virunga and there are more orphan gorillas to care for. Or maybe it’s the other way around.

Michael Paterniti is a contributing writer for the magazine.


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2,300-year-old Buddhist temple discovered in northwest Pakistan http://gurugama.org/2300-year-old-buddhist-temple-discovered-in-northwest-pakistan/ Sun, 19 Dec 2021 16:28:19 +0000 http://gurugama.org/2300-year-old-buddhist-temple-discovered-in-northwest-pakistan/ The remains of a 2,300-year-old Buddhist temple were unearthed in northwest Pakistan along with several other Buddhist artefacts by a joint team of Pakistani and Italian archaeologists. Archaeologists from the Italian archaeological mission known as ISMEO have excavated the ruins of the Buddhist-period town of Bazira at Barikot tehsil in the district of Swat in […]]]>

The remains of a 2,300-year-old Buddhist temple were unearthed in northwest Pakistan along with several other Buddhist artefacts by a joint team of Pakistani and Italian archaeologists. Archaeologists from the Italian archaeological mission known as ISMEO have excavated the ruins of the Buddhist-period town of Bazira at Barikot tehsil in the district of Swat in the province of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, together with archaeologists from Pakistan. A few days ago, the Italian Mission also announced the discovery of an entire Shahi Vishnuite temple in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa.

A senior official said: “Pakistani and Italian archaeologists during joint excavations at historic site have uncovered more than 2,300 years of Buddhist period apsidal temple in northwest Pakistan in addition to recovering other valuable artifacts. . The temple discovered in Swat is even older than the temples discovered in Taxila, vestiges of Pakistan. The temple is said to be the oldest Buddhist temple in Pakistan.

About 2,700 ancient artefacts from the Buddhist period, including coins, rings, jars, and Kharosthi language scriptures from the period of Greek King Menander, have been unearthed during the excavations.

Andreas Ferrarese, Ambassador of Italy to Pakistan informed that the archaeological sites in Pakistan were of great importance for the different religions of the world.

Notably, Italian archaeologist Luca M. Olivieri had earlier said that a series of thieves ‘pits had also been explored at Khyber Pakhtunkhwa and that excavations revealed a Buddhist monument that had survived the thieves’ vandalism. Regarding another excavation at Barikot which was carried out in November 2021, Olivieri said: “We have discovered a row of tombs of unknown age and other archaeological features. These tombs contain shards of pottery and other rare finds that could date (typologically and preliminary) to the Indo-Greek and Saka-Parthian period.

Italian experts have expressed confidence that more archaeological sites will be discovered during excavations in the historic town of Bazira in the district of Swat. Dr Abdus Samad, director of the museum and archeology, said the town of Bazira in Barikot Swat is older than Taxila remains. Doctoral students from the best Italian universities and from the archaeological departments of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa participated in the excavations of these sites.

Dr Samad informed that the government of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa has purchased fourteen archaeological sites, where excavations are underway.


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Free Will Astrology – The Santa Barbara Independent http://gurugama.org/free-will-astrology-the-santa-barbara-independent/ Thu, 16 Dec 2021 07:12:23 +0000 http://gurugama.org/free-will-astrology-the-santa-barbara-independent/ RAM (March 21-April 19): Key questions for you, from now and through 2022: (1) What do you need to say but haven’t said yet? (2) What is crucial for you that you haven’t done yet? (3) What dream have you overlooked that you shouldn’t neglect anymore? (4) Which shrine is essential for you to visit, […]]]>

RAM

(March 21-April 19): Key questions for you, from now and through 2022: (1) What do you need to say but haven’t said yet? (2) What is crucial for you that you haven’t done yet? (3) What dream have you overlooked that you shouldn’t neglect anymore? (4) Which shrine is essential for you to visit, but you haven’t visited yet? (5) For what “sin” is it important for you to forgive yourself, but you have not yet forgiven yourself? (6) What promise have you not yet fulfilled, even though it is late (but not too late!) To fulfill it? (7) What secret have you hid so well that you have mostly even hid it from yourself?

TAURUS

(April 20-May 20): Taurus novelist Anthony Trollope (1815-1882) took one of his manuscripts to a publishing house, hoping it would be turned into a book and sold to the public. A few weeks later, he learned by mail that his masterpiece had been rejected. He took a train to the editor’s office and picked it up. On his way back by train, he turned the manuscript over and began to write a new story on the back of each page. He didn’t spend time moping. Taurus is the spirit that I recommend you embody in the weeks to come.

GEMINI

(May 21-June 20): “John Coltrane was an addict,” author Cornel West wrote of the famous saxophonist and jazz composer. “Billie Holiday was an addict. [Nobel Prize–winning author] Eugene O’Neill was an addict. What would America be without the drug addicts and post-addicts who make such a great contribution to our society? I salute West’s sympathetic views towards drug addicts. Many of us who are not addicts understand how lucky we are that we do not have the genetic predisposition or traumatic experiences that addicts often struggle with. We non-addicts may also have been spared the bigotry and abuse that has contributed to and exacerbated the addiction of some drug addicts. Having recognized these truths, I nevertheless hope to do all I can to help you convert any addictive tendencies you may have into passionate obsessions. Now is an excellent time to start a new phase of this work. Invitation: Make a list of three things you can do over the next few months to keep the process going.

CANCER

(June 21-July 22): Actress and model Kate Beckinsale unleashed an enigmatic boast: “My best feature is unfortunately a private affair, even though I’m told it’s spectacular. But you can’t really walk the red carpet. What can I say ? Can you imagine what I imagine? I bring this quirk to your attention in the hope that I can convince you to be more direct and expressive about your own wonderful qualities. It’s time to be less shy about your beauty, less secret about your deep assets. Show the world why you are so lovable.

LEO

(July 23-August 22): Edna Ferber (1885-1968), born in Leo, was a famous author who won a Pulitzer Prize. She was witty and outspoken. Her stories featured strong women and figures struggling against discrimination. “I would never open a door and walk through the door,” she said of her career. “I had to break it for hell. I just naturally liked to do things the hard way. At least in the coming weeks, Leo, I urge you NOT to take Ferber’s attitude. In my opinion, you will be wise to do all you can to open the doors rather than knock them down. And the best way to do that is to ask for help. Cultivate your ability to ask for what you need. Refine your practice of the arts of collaboration, synergy and interweaving.

VIRGIN

(23 August-22 September): “No one has ever written, painted, sculpted, modeled, constructed or invented, except literally to come out of hell”, wrote the playwright of the Virgin Antonin Artaud. That’s a ridiculous generalization, in my opinion. For example, I occasionally generate songs, stories, and horoscopes to help me escape a momentary hell. But most of my designs are inspired by my love of life and a desire to inspire others. I am very sure that in the weeks to come, your own motivations for producing good things will be much closer to mine than to those of Artaud. You are in a phase where your quest for joy, generosity, blessings, and pleasure could be fierce and productive.


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BALANCE

(23 Sep-22 Oct): Author Barbara Sher gave this wise advice: “Imaginary obstacles are insurmountable. The real ones are not. I bring this to your attention because I believe that the coming weeks will be a great time to identify the imaginary obstacles that you have erected in your inner world and then break them down, burn them down or eliminate them. Once you are free from illusory interference, I think you will find that you will have at least twice as much power to neutralize real obstacles.

SCORPIO

(23 Oct-21 Nov): Prolific author Ray Bradbury loved giving advice to those with a strong need to express their imaginative originality. Since I expect you to be a person like that in 2022, I will pass on one of his exhortations to you. He wrote: “If you want to create you must be the most sublime fool that God ever made and sent to wander. I wish you a wrestling match with your Creative Muse that will last a lifetime. I wish you madness, madness and madness. Keep in mind that Bradbury was referring to constructive madness, wise madness, and divine madness.

SAGITTARIUS

(November 22-December 21): The coming months will be a good time for you to redefine the meaning of the term “sacred” and to deepen your relationship with the sacred. To spark your imagination, I offer four quotes: (1) “Recognizing the sacred begins when we take an interest in every detail of our life. “- Buddhist teacher Chögyam Trungpa (2)” When you notice something clearly and see it clearly, then it becomes sacred. “- poet Allen Ginsberg (3)” Holiness begins with the recognition of the face of the other. —Philosopher Marc-Alain Ouaknin (4) “Modern culture, in its advertising of sex, erroneously announces its aspiration to the sacred. —Professor Sobonfu Somé

CAPRICORN

(December 22-January 19): Capricorn author EM Forster wrote, “The only books that influence us are those we’re ready for that have gone a little further on our particular path than we have yet on our own. I propose that we universalize this statement: “The only people, information and experiences that influence us are those for whom we are ready and who have gone a little further on our particular path than we have yet gone ourselves. I believe this principle will be particularly fruitful for you to embrace over the next three months. Prepare for the lessons that are vital for you to learn – and at the frontier of your understanding

AQUARIUS

(January 20-February 18): Among America’s Founding Fathers was Aquarius William Whipple (1730-1785). He was one of 56 men who signed the Declaration of Independence in 1776, starting war with Britain. Unlike many of his colleagues, however, Whipple believed it was hypocritical to enslave human beings while striving for freedom. This is why he emancipated the person who had been a slave to him. The next few months will be a good time to make comparable corrections, Aquarius. If there are any discrepancies between your ideals and your actions, solve the problem.

PISCES

(February 19-March 20): According to Pisces author Ryūnosuke Akutagawa, “Sometimes people dedicate their lives to a desire that they are not sure will ever be fulfilled. ” So true! I can personally attest to this behavior. Is such a quest ill-advised? Delusional? Naive? Not in my opinion. I see him as glorious, courageous and heroic. Akutagawa too. He said that those who refrain from having inspiring desires are “mere spectators of life.” Either way, I recommend that you think big in 2022, Pisces. Astrologically, this could be the year you come home and hone and enhance the most important desire you will ever have.

Homework: Tell me about your most important lesson of the year. Newsletter.FreeWillAstrology.com.


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Free Will Astrology: Week of December 16, 2021 http://gurugama.org/free-will-astrology-week-of-december-16-2021/ Tue, 14 Dec 2021 13:00:39 +0000 http://gurugama.org/free-will-astrology-week-of-december-16-2021/ Pierre Puvis de Chavannes, “The Sacred Grove, Beloved of the Arts and the Muses,” Potter Palmer Collection / courtesy Art Institute of Chicago RAM (March 21-April 19): Key questions for you, from now on and through 2022: 1. What do you need to say that you haven’t said yet? 2. What is crucial for you […]]]>

Pierre Puvis de Chavannes, “The Sacred Grove, Beloved of the Arts and the Muses,” Potter Palmer Collection / courtesy Art Institute of Chicago

RAM (March 21-April 19): Key questions for you, from now on and through 2022: 1. What do you need to say that you haven’t said yet? 2. What is crucial for you that you haven’t done yet? 3. What dream have you overlooked and should not neglect anymore? 4. Which shrine is essential for you to visit, but you haven’t visited yet? 5. For what “sin” is it important for you to forgive yourself, but you have not yet forgiven yourself? 6. What promise have you not kept yet, even though it is late (but not too late!) To keep it? 7. What secret have you hid so well that you have mostly even hid it from yourself?

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Taurus novelist Anthony Trollope (1815-1882) took one of his manuscripts to a publishing house, hoping it would be turned into a book and sold to the public. A few weeks later, he learned by mail that his masterpiece had been rejected. He took a train to the editor’s office and picked it up. On his way back by train, he turned the manuscript over and began to write a new story on the back of each page. He didn’t spend time moping. Taurus is the spirit that I recommend you embody in the weeks to come.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): “John Coltrane was an addict,” author Cornel West wrote of the famous saxophonist and jazz composer. “Billie Holiday was an addict. [Nobel Prize-winning author] Eugene O’Neill was an addict. What would America be without the drug addicts and post-addicts who make such a great contribution to our society? I salute West’s sympathetic views towards drug addicts. Many of us who are not addicts understand how lucky we are that we do not have the genetic predisposition or traumatic experiences that addicts often struggle with. We non-addicts may also have been spared the bigotry and abuse that contributed to and exacerbated the addictions of some drug addicts. Having recognized these truths, I nevertheless hope to do all I can to help you convert any addictive tendencies you may have into passionate obsessions. Now is an excellent time to start a new phase of this work. Invitation: Make a list of three things you can do over the next few months to keep the process going.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Actress and model Kate Beckinsale unleashed an enigmatic boast: “My best feature film is unfortunately a private affair, even though I’m told it’s spectacular. But you can’t really walk the red carpet. What can I say ? Can you imagine what I imagine? I bring this quirk to your attention in the hope that I can convince you to be more direct and expressive about your own wonderful qualities. It’s time to be less shy about your beauty, less secret about your deep assets. Show the world why you are so lovable.

LEO (July 23-August 22): Edna Ferber (1885-1968), born in Leo, was a famous author who won a Pulitzer Prize. She was witty and outspoken. Her stories featured strong women and figures struggling against discrimination. “I would never open a door and walk through the door,” she said of her career. “I had to break it for hell. I just naturally liked to do things the hard way. At least in the coming weeks, Leo, I urge you NOT to take Ferber’s attitude. In my opinion, you will be wise to do all you can to open the doors rather than knock them down. And the best way to do that is to ask for help. Cultivate your ability to ask for what you need. Refine your practice of the arts of collaboration, synergy and interweaving.

VIRGIN (23 August-22 September): “No one has ever written, painted, sculpted, modeled, constructed or invented, except literally to get out of hell”, wrote the playwright of the Virgin Antonin Artaud. That’s a ridiculous generalization, in my opinion. For example, I occasionally create songs, stories, and horoscopes to help me escape a momentary hell. But most of my designs are inspired by my love of life and a desire to inspire others. I am very sure that in the weeks to come, your own motivations for producing good things will be much closer to mine than to those of Artaud. You are in a phase where your quest for joy, generosity, blessings, and pleasure could be fierce and productive.

BALANCE (September 23-October 22): Author Barbara Sher gave this wise advice: “Imaginary obstacles are insurmountable. The real ones are not. I draw your attention to this point because I believe that the coming weeks will be a great time to identify the imaginary obstacles that you have erected in your inner world and then break them down, burn them down or eliminate them. Once you are free from illusory interference, I think you will find that you will have at least twice as much power to neutralize real obstacles.

SCORPIO (23 Oct-21 Nov): Prolific author Ray Bradbury loved giving advice to those with a strong need to express their imaginative originality. Since I expect you to be a person like that in 2022, I will pass on one of his exhortations to you. He wrote: “If you want to create you must be the most sublime fool that God ever made and sent to wander. I wish you a wrestling match with your Creative Muse that will last a lifetime. I wish you madness, madness and madness. Keep in mind that Bradbury was referring to constructive madness, wise madness, and Divine Madness.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): The coming months will be a good time for you to redefine the meaning of the term “sacred” and to deepen your relationship with the sacred. To stimulate your imagination, I offer you four quotes: 1. “Recognizing the sacred begins when we take an interest in every detail of our life. “- Buddhist teacher Chögyam Trungpa 2.” When you notice something clearly and see it clearly, then it becomes sacred. “- poet Allen Ginsberg 3.” Holiness begins with the recognition of the face of the other. —Philosopher Marc-Alain Ouaknin 4. “Modern culture, in its advertising of sex, erroneously announces its desire for the sacred. —Professor Sobonfu Somé

CAPRICORN (Dec 22-Jan 19): Capricorn author EM Forster wrote: “The only books that influence us are those for which we are ready, and which have gone a little further on our particular path than we are yet. went ourselves. I suggest that we universalize this statement: “The only people, information and experiences that influence us are those for whom we are ready and who have gone a little further on our particular path than we have yet gone ourselves. I believe this principle will be particularly fruitful for you to embrace over the next three months. Prepare for lessons that are vital for you to learn and at the frontier of your understanding.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Among America’s Founding Fathers was Aquarius William Whipple (1730-1785). He was one of fifty-six men who signed the Declaration of Independence in 1776, starting war with Britain. Unlike many of his colleagues, however, Whipple believed it was hypocritical to enslave human beings while striving for freedom. This is why he emancipated the person who had been a slave to him. The next few months will be a good time to make comparable corrections, Aquarius. If there are any discrepancies between your ideals and your actions, solve the problem.

PISCES (February 19-March 20): According to Pisces author Ryunosuke Akutagawa, “Sometimes people dedicate their lives to a desire that they are not sure will ever be fulfilled. So true! I can personally attest to this behavior. Is such a quest ill-advised? Delusional? Naive? Not in my opinion. I see him as glorious, courageous and heroic. Akutagawa too. He said that those who refrain from having inspiring desires are “mere spectators of life.” Either way, I recommend that you think big in 2022, Pisces. From an astrological standpoint, this could be the year you settle down and refine and enhance the most important desire you will ever have.

Homework: Tell me about your most important lesson of the year. Newsletter.FreeWillAstrology


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What’s in Your Office: Deborah Cowman, Executive Director, Brazos Valley Museum of Natural History | Brazos 360 http://gurugama.org/whats-in-your-office-deborah-cowman-executive-director-brazos-valley-museum-of-natural-history-brazos-360/ Sun, 12 Dec 2021 06:00:00 +0000 http://gurugama.org/whats-in-your-office-deborah-cowman-executive-director-brazos-valley-museum-of-natural-history-brazos-360/ Deborah Cowman joined the Brazos Valley Museum of Natural History in 2008. CASSIE STRICKER ROB CLARK Deborah Cowman takes the concept of being active seriously in her office at the Brazos Valley Natural History Museum. The executive director of the museum has a conveyor belt that leads to a standing desk. So when she works […]]]>





Deborah Cowman joined the Brazos Valley Museum of Natural History in 2008.


CASSIE STRICKER


ROB CLARK

Deborah Cowman takes the concept of being active seriously in her office at the Brazos Valley Natural History Museum.

The executive director of the museum has a conveyor belt that leads to a standing desk. So when she works on her computer most of the time she walks too.

“It keeps me more alert,” she says. “I am more tired if I sit a lot. You have to get up and move. I rarely call my staff, I just go wherever they are. I am getting older, I have to keep moving. Use it or lose it. So it’s part of my goal to be healthy.

Born in Panama and raised in Iowa, Cowman came to Texas to work at the Houston Museum of Natural Science. She attended Texas A&M for her Masters and PhD in Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences with an emphasis on eco-toxicology.

Cowman joined the museum in 2008 and describes his role as a mixture of fundraising, grant writing, networking, marketing and research. She describes her office as “very eclectic”, in part thanks to the influence of her father (part Cherokee) and her mother (part Indian from Central America).

The museum aims to educate, motivate and inspire, she said.

“I think the best part of my job is seeing that bulb light up in a kid’s face when he walks into the gallery with his parents or he’s in one of our classes,” says -she. “Because we are celebrating our 60th anniversary this year, we have people returning who are now professional scientists, or who have entered the museum field, tell us that they got their start here. It was the place that turned them on. This is what really motivates me to preserve what we have for future generations.


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Tudung Politics: For the Nation to Progress, We Must Build Bridges http://gurugama.org/tudung-politics-for-the-nation-to-progress-we-must-build-bridges/ Wed, 08 Dec 2021 01:01:41 +0000 http://gurugama.org/tudung-politics-for-the-nation-to-progress-we-must-build-bridges/ YOUR SAY | “No hope for the country if everything is deemed political.” COMMENT | Hannah Yeoh’s tudung threading and DAP’s hypocrisy Anonymous_15897060865429524: Not all political acts are “bad”. Some are necessary. DAP has an image problem. He is seen as “too Chinese” and “anti-Malay”. Rightly or wrongly, such is the perception. What DAP MP […]]]>

YOUR SAY | “No hope for the country if everything is deemed political.”

COMMENT | Hannah Yeoh’s tudung threading and DAP’s hypocrisy

Anonymous_15897060865429524: Not all political acts are “bad”. Some are necessary. DAP has an image problem. He is seen as “too Chinese” and “anti-Malay”. Rightly or wrongly, such is the perception.

What DAP MP for Segambut, Hannah Yeoh, did was a political act, yes. But it was a small step towards correcting this image problem plaguing DAP.

The point is, Malaysia is a predominantly Malaysian and predominantly Muslim country. And to make this country better, we need Malaysians and Muslims on board. There’s no point in dipping your head in the centuries-old sand and pretending everything else is irrelevant.

For this nation to progress, we must build bridges between the races. This is the only way. And if political acts, even seemingly superficial, are needed, if this helps to reduce antagonism and mistrust between communities, why not?

Anonymous54: So in the thought of Malaysiakini columnist S Thayaparan, should elected officials not visit any religious institution in their constituency?

I remember that Amanah’s vice president, Mujahid Yusof Rawa, frequently visited churches and temples to chat with them for information and feedback. Really, there is no hope for this country if every gesture of a politician is deemed political.

I have visited Buddhist temples in Thailand where the temple required that women wearing shorts or dresses above the knees be required to wear a draped jumpsuit, and they provided them to visitors for a small fee.

PESamuel: Thayaparan, I regularly read your articles and agree with most. But on this question, I think you are totally wrong. This question isn’t even worth writing or commenting on, let alone criticizing – whether by you or someone else.

Here all we had was a woman who had the courtesy of following the accepted dress code for the situation. What does it matter if she is a politician or at the DAP?

When I went to a gurdwara, I wore a scarf on my head. When my British friend visited us he took his shoes off at the door without me telling him. When I did the same at his house, he asked me to put them back on because everyone was wearing their shoes inside.

We must respect our respective cultures. As simple and mundane as that!

MarioT: Instead of appreciating him for his kind gesture and goodwill, Thayaparan uses him as fodder to attack and ridicule.

This narrow thinking has also heavily influenced some of the non-Malays who are always on the lookout for the ulterior motives of such actions instead of the goodness they portray.

MRS: If one separated Yeoh from her party and regarded her as an ordinary citizen, there should be nothing disconcerting about her dress for the mosque. But if we consider her as a political operator, her motivation becomes suspect and the word that comes to her mind is appeasement.

She could be both a true believer in Christian charity following the “do to others” rule and an intriguing political opportunist who wants to score points.

While I was one of many who supported her decision to dress like she did, I would also be among the first to bring her down if politics were all in her heart. But how will I ever know?

Anonymous_15897060865429524: @MS, if politics were his intention, could that be called bad intention? She is, after all, a politician. Not all political acts are “bad”. The question is, was it harmful?

MRS: @ Anonymous_15897060865429524, yes it is bad if it was pure selfish politics (with the media in tow) and not really a real act of respect. She deserves everything scheming politicians deserve from a skeptical and cynical public.

Why is that? Because politicians do not have the right to use a place of worship and false piety to improve their electoral prospects. I said the same to Malaysian politicians who put on kurtas and garlands to endear themselves to the gullible Indians of the Batu Caves.

So it really depends on the intention. And since none of us can get into anyone’s heart and mind, it’s best to take it at face value. This is what I did when the photo of Yeoh wearing selendang first appeared.

Existential Turd: In another context, donning a tudung while visiting a mosque is a sign of respect. But in Malaysia, respect is one-sided. It is not reciprocated.

“Respect” as practiced in Malaysia is like between a master and a servant. The servant must respect and obey the master, but the master need only show magnanimity towards the servant at most.

Respect as practiced in Malaysia is not between peers or equals. This is why “respect” is politicized in Malaysia. So when a non-Muslim shows respect to Muslims, it is seen as submission by both Muslims and non-Muslims.

Muslims see this as another confirmation of their ketuanan status, and non-Muslims see it as being treated again as lower status citizens.

Remember the time when Umno’s Tengku Razaleigh Hamzah wore a native Sabah tribe head covering with a pattern that looked like a cross? It wasn’t even a real cross, just the resemblance was enough to annoy Malays / Muslims.

“Respect” is another victim of the militarization of religion by the majority in Malaysia.

Sanakyan: @Existential Turd, indeed respect is a two way street. Muslims and non-Muslims practicing their own religion must show mutual respect.

In Malaysia, respect is demanded by the majority race as they do everything in their political power to demonize and demonize other faiths.

Why then should non-Muslims bend over backwards to please and show their submission to ketuanan type?

If it is political expediency (begging their votes), then it is a futile exercise. There is no respect on their part as those in the Malaysian Dignity Congress have shown.


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These comments are compiled to reflect the views of Malaysiakini subscribers on matters of public interest. Malaysiakini does not intend to present these opinions as facts.


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Maybe it’s time for me to let go of Thomas Merton http://gurugama.org/maybe-its-time-for-me-to-let-go-of-thomas-merton/ Mon, 06 Dec 2021 07:25:12 +0000 http://gurugama.org/maybe-its-time-for-me-to-let-go-of-thomas-merton/ Grave of Thomas Merton at Gethsemani Abbey, Trappist, Ky. (Photo by Jim Forest, used via a Creative Commons license) “How can we be sure that the younger generations know Thomas Merton? “ Every time I show Day of a stranger, the documentary film that I made on the Trappist monk, I am asked this question […]]]>

Grave of Thomas Merton at Gethsemani Abbey, Trappist, Ky. (Photo by Jim Forest, used via a Creative Commons license)

“How can we be sure that the younger generations know Thomas Merton? “

Every time I show Day of a stranger, the documentary film that I made on the Trappist monk, I am asked this question in one form or another. Viewers find Merton’s words – which I pulled from a set of Consciousness Flow recordings made during his hermit years on the grounds of Gethsemane Abbey in Kentucky – oddly premonitory, and, as me, they want to share them with others.

This anxiety about forgetting Merton has surfaced at every Merton conference or panel I have attended since 2011. It was at this point that I quit my job as a counselor and went to the 17 Trappist monasteries in the United States and I began to work. on my writings, films and podcasts on the contemplative life. Although I, a queer, non-Catholic young woman, was an unlikely ambassador for Merton, I have often been invited to participate in presentations and celebrations of Merton’s legacy. Each time, people looked around the room, taking note of their mostly white, mostly gray-haired neighbors, and wondering how this legacy can last, if its wisdom will be forgotten.

Generally, I responded with encouragement, citing Merton’s interfaith dialogue, his model of friendship, or the extent of his correspondence as how his legacy might endure. But at my last film screening, after much thought on the matter, I responded with my own question: “What’s wrong with Merton’s disappearance?”


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