Buddhist writing – Gurugama http://gurugama.org/ Sat, 25 Sep 2021 20:16:06 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 http://gurugama.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/favicon-16.png Buddhist writing – Gurugama http://gurugama.org/ 32 32 Show your trump card: write results in life sciences http://gurugama.org/show-your-trump-card-write-results-in-life-sciences/ Sat, 25 Sep 2021 19:40:38 +0000 http://gurugama.org/show-your-trump-card-write-results-in-life-sciences/ The results section of an article is of primary interest to readers as it provides new and hitherto unknown facts to the scientific literature. Readers are always eager to read your results. Results are the engine of scientific expression. Presenting your results honestly is always necessary in scientific writing, although your findings may not be […]]]>

The results section of an article is of primary interest to readers as it provides new and hitherto unknown facts to the scientific literature. Readers are always eager to read your results. Results are the engine of scientific expression. Presenting your results honestly is always necessary in scientific writing, although your findings may not be very promising.

In addition, presenting your results in scientific communications with honesty gives you high self-satisfaction. Posting false results to become famous or to increase the length or content of your CV is not acceptable. The results of the experiments described in the methods are presented in the results section of a manuscript in a clear and easy to understand manner with statistical analysis.

Results can be presented more effectively with the help of clear pictures and tables in the results section. The Scientific Communication Results section summarizes the results of the methods you used in a manuscript in a clear and concise manner without using any interpretations. The results section is not the place to describe your methods or experimental details.

Main conclusions

In other words, the results section displays your main findings from your investigations in an unbiased sequence or logical aspect, allowing readers for clarifications or late assessments in the discussion section. One of the main purposes of a results section is to break your results down into clear sentences that show their importance to the problem you are studying. The results section also provides strong support for your hypothesis.

Avoid discussing or interpreting your results in this section. Avoid presenting the same data or repeating the same information several times. Also avoid presenting tables with blurry images and data. Blurry images and data give the reader a negative view of the status of your article. This section includes both results and data that is displayed in text, figures, tables or graphs. The results are written in the textual data, the most crucial part of the results, are expressed in tables or figures with dynamic interaction.

Tables are used to summarize a large amount of data and to organize and display data clearly as text or paragraphs. In addition, the tables help to facilitate calculations. Rather, figures or graphs are used to express data that is not presentable as table text, allowing readers to understand the information in a quick and easy way. A summary of what appears in tables and figures without reiterating all the numbers is recommended in a text in the results and discussion section.

A well-written scientific communication includes the results of each method described in the Methods Describing the Results of Experimental and Control Groups. Authors are strongly advised to avoid inappropriate results but without neglecting valid anomalies, which call into question your research hypothesis or do not support the available scientific literature.

I have met famous writers on science writings who advise reporting everything in science communications, including negative results. However, in my opinion, reporting negative results or negative findings is not straightforward and will make it difficult for researchers to reflect on current scientific theories or findings. Additionally, it prevents your study from replicating, which can directly affect your survey citations. It is important to note that citation of unpublished data is also not recommended by high impact journals, unless the hypothesis under study has strong support.

It is always important to emphasize the statistical significance in the results section. However, the authors should clearly understand the difference between the statistical and biological significance of your results. Static analysis is an analytical way to predict or express the validity of your data. Biological significance indicates how your findings are truly significant to a basic scientific phenomenon.

Scientific communication

In scientific communications, different ways have been used to display the results: (A) chronological order, (B) general to specific, (C) most to least important and (D) grouping of results by subject.

Unless otherwise stated in the journal guidelines, authors are free to select an ideal model in a logical manner. Of these, chronological order is commonly used and simple, and the results are expressed alongside the methods followed in a manuscript. General to specific means are frequently used in manuscripts describing clinical findings. Most important to least important or meaning is used when the authors immediately illustrate something important. Grouping of results by subject is frequently seen in scientific communications which describe the comparison of tests, analytical methods and diagnostic methods.

Since not all results are of equal importance in a science paper, authors should highlight important findings and tone down less important so that readers can distinguish them. To highlight important results, authors can always start paragraphs by including the most important results. Paragraphs should be free from repetitions and long sentences. References rarely seen in the results section.

Uploading additional results or data as an additional file will help keep your results section clean and concise. The present tense is commonly used in the results section, except in some hypothesis testing studies where the past tense is used. In particular, it has been reported that he used simple terms such as show, demonstrate, indicate, Illustrate, highlight, mean, state, observe, confirm, etc. when viewing results. It is advisable to use the term “importance” only to indicate statistical significance.

I have seen the term “reveal” in a number of articles related to the life sciences. But, some famous scientific authors advise against using this term because it indicates that something comes from magic. Additionally, avoid using emotional words such as sadly, remarkably, interesting, and critical in the results to describe your results. Also, avoid using negative sentences. For example, the sentence “patients without kidney disease were not included” can be simplified by removing the negative terms “without and not”: patients with kidney disease were included. An article outlining tips for writing a successful discussion will be available next week.


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New Jewish Fringe Festival for Golders Green http://gurugama.org/new-jewish-fringe-festival-for-golders-green/ Fri, 24 Sep 2021 13:53:00 +0000 http://gurugama.org/new-jewish-fringe-festival-for-golders-green/ A new ‘broad Jewish flavor’ music, drama and comedy festival is coming to Golders Green this fall. Named after Hebrew for the ritual fringes worn by Orthodox Jews, Tsitsit is a national festival with events at the King Alfred Phoenix Theater in North End Road. All were selected according to the marginal ethic of “if […]]]>

A new ‘broad Jewish flavor’ music, drama and comedy festival is coming to Golders Green this fall.

Named after Hebrew for the ritual fringes worn by Orthodox Jews, Tsitsit is a national festival with events at the King Alfred Phoenix Theater in North End Road.

All were selected according to the marginal ethic of “if you want to do it, you can” and the criteria: “If it’s Jewish enough for you, it’s Jewish enough for us.”

“The assembly was a labor of love,” says founder and North Londoner Alastair Falk. “We are delighted to have a program that covers Jewish culture in all its dazzling variety.”

The former principal of Independent Jewish Day School and King Solomon High School added: “A few years ago I had a one man show called Much Ado About Noshing and got the bangs bug. by performing in Edinburgh. our own festival on the sidelines.


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“In the spirit of the sidelines, we tried to be as open as possible. We spread the word and got a fantastic number of people writing their own solo pieces, performances by professional theater companies aside. whole and more marginal experimental work by theater school people. “

Performances begin October 3 with a high stand-up in New York Michael CapozolleKugelroni’s new show. Later in the week, the comedian Aaron Levene see what it means to be a Buddhist Jew, and on October 6 following a sold-out race at Camden Fringe, a Jewish stand-up comedy Jew-O-Rama takes to the Phoenix scene.

On October 16, a team of Israeli and Palestinian directors present The demons of Jerusalem and on October 17, a program of Sephardic songs with voice, guitar and percussion. Two half-hour plays by the award-winning writer, Robert messik: Pineapple, on pregnancy and pizza; and Crust on Carnival in Ancient Babylon, are October 18-19, then October 20 is a reimagining of 18th-century Portuguese Jewish playwright Antonio José da Silva’s version of Don Quixote and Sancho Panza.

Comic October 23 Daphna baram offers his new show Unmuted, and October 24 is The wolf of Baghdad is an audiovisual journey through the memories of a Jewish family from their lost Iraqi homeland. The Gamayun Theater Company’s cover of classic Israeli comedy, Rubber merchants October 25-28, and the UK’s response to Ms. Maisel, actress Carole shaw presents his new show, Keep Kalm and Kvetch on October 30.

Throughout the half-week there is a twice daily children’s show Meet At the Ark At Eight, based on a popular book about smuggling a third penguin aboard Noah’s Ark.

Falk says a grant from the Arts Council allowed them to subsidize or commission new works and develop shows. Events also include a Halloween-themed night at the Jewish Museum in Camden Town and a cabaret night at the Soho Theater.

“Our watchword is diverse and dispersed. We wanted to reflect part of the history of Jewish settlement in the UK, so we have events in Leicester, Penzance as well as Manchester, Edinburgh and Cambridge. is the first year, and if that doesn’t kill us, we hope it grows. It’s open, easy to get to, and you don’t have to be Jewish to enjoy it.

For more details and tickets, go to https://tsitsitfringe.org/


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Who are the Isulate Britain protesters and what do they want? http://gurugama.org/who-are-the-isulate-britain-protesters-and-what-do-they-want/ Fri, 24 Sep 2021 12:44:23 +0000 http://gurugama.org/who-are-the-isulate-britain-protesters-and-what-do-they-want/ The IT manager, from London, helped block the M25 and A13 junction on Monday. She is believed to have been involved in Extinction Rebellion since 2018 and has been involved in actions such as blockades in Waltham Forest. She describes herself on social media as a “citizen of the world” and “rebel”, as well as […]]]>

The IT manager, from London, helped block the M25 and A13 junction on Monday. She is believed to have been involved in Extinction Rebellion since 2018 and has been involved in actions such as blockades in Waltham Forest.

She describes herself on social media as a “citizen of the world” and “rebel”, as well as a cyclist, walker and gardener.

However, Ms. Eagling was not always so interested in carbon neutral transportation. She traveled to India twice with a group of people who cycled across India. A newspaper written by the “rebel” said they took their bikes with them in their hand luggage.

Her travel blog shows that she has flown to other countries around the world, including Cuba, Panama, Costa Rica and Nicaragua.

Dr Diana Warner

The retired Bristol GP had a long history with the Extinction Rebellion protests before being arrested on Wednesday for his involvement in the blockade of the M25.

She previously served as the Green Party parliamentary candidate in the 2015 and 2017 general election for Filton & Bradley Stoke, which is owned by Jack Lopresti, a Tory backbench MP.

She was arrested and charged with conspiracy to commit criminal damage to buildings, including the offices of the British Medical Association.

Dr Warner then went on a six-day hunger strike while in Eastwood Park Women’s Prison, only stopping after learning that conversations about climate change among doctors were “coming in. in the mainstream ”.

David McKenny

Mr McKenny was among several Extinction Rebellion protesters who attempted to confront Sir David Attenborough at home after criticizing the group’s tactics.

The veteran environmentalist and presenter said the group’s illegal protests would alienate people and deter them from tackling climate change.

Mr Attenborough was protecting himself from the coronavirus as four women and two men, including McKenny, knocked on his door.

Dave McKenny refused to submit to his Extinction Rebellion trial at the City of London Magistrates’ Court on Earth Day, April 22. The magistrate found him in contempt of court and sent him to jail for 14 days.

Priyadaka, 60 years old

The Buddhist teacher describes himself as a successful charity fundraiser at the Cambridge Buddhist Center. He regularly travels to India for Buddhist retreats.

In a Youtube video explaining his actions, he said he didn’t want to go to a police cell or the anger of a lot of people, but “we have to act now”. He said the government’s action would be a reward for the public’s negativity and that he understood he was a “real inconvenience” for people at the moment.

Donald Bell, pictured below


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Montana has the second highest COVID hospitalization rate in the country http://gurugama.org/montana-has-the-second-highest-covid-hospitalization-rate-in-the-country/ Thu, 23 Sep 2021 20:25:38 +0000 http://gurugama.org/montana-has-the-second-highest-covid-hospitalization-rate-in-the-country/ Financial website Wallet Hub, as of this week, placed Montana in the ranking of the last 10 safest states in the United States during the COVID pandemic, which means 40 states are safer to live in than the Montana during the pandemic, but also that Montana has the second highest rate of COVID hospitalizations. Wallet […]]]>

Financial website Wallet Hub, as of this week, placed Montana in the ranking of the last 10 safest states in the United States during the COVID pandemic, which means 40 states are safer to live in than the Montana during the pandemic, but also that Montana has the second highest rate of COVID hospitalizations.

Wallet Hub analyst Jill Gonzalez provided details on the statistics.

“Currently, the data set includes the rate of populations testing positive for COVID-19 transmission, deaths, as well as the share of the eligible population getting vaccinated,” Gonzalez said. “Montana is 43rd in terms of safety, so it’s in the bottom 10. And this is really the case thanks to two measures. Currently, Montana has the fourth highest transmission rate in the country. And because of that, he also has the second highest hospitalization rate right now. “

Gonzalez compared Montana to several northeastern states that are in the top 10 safest states during the pandemic.

“You see the northeastern states are doing their best here,” she said. “Massachusetts, Vermont, Connecticut, Rhode Island, New Jersey and New York State all have the highest vaccination rates in the country, and it snowballed from there. This is why we do not see as many positive test cases and especially not as many hospitalizations or deaths. “

Gonzalez acknowledged that the Montana legislature denied communities the ability to impose masks or vaccination warrants, a fact that gives other states an advantage in controlling the spread of the virus.

“This is what you see in the northeast or especially at the level of the big cities,” she said. “In a lot of those states where proof of vaccination is required to enter a restaurant or bar, a concert, a lot of these big, enclosed spaces are moving into winter, and we’ll see more and more of them.”

Gonzalez exposed the near future of the COVID pandemic and that recovery depends on a high percentage of vaccinations.

“Our economic recovery will only reach its full potential when the vast majority of people medically capable of getting vaccinated do so,” she said. “The more people who refuse to be vaccinated, the greater the risk to public health, especially as the new Delta COVID-19 variant spreads. The level of security in the country has an impact on the economy as it relates to the lifting of restrictions, and it is up to the people to decide how confident people are to go out and spend the money.

The dataset includes COVID-19 transmission rates, positive tests, hospitalizations and deaths, as well as the share of the eligible population getting vaccinated.

Becker’s Hospital Review has Montana with the third highest hospitalization rate.

WATCH: Milestones in women’s history since you were born

Women have left their mark on everything from entertainment and music to space exploration, athletics and technology. Each passing year and each new milestone clearly shows how recent this history is compared to the rest of the country, as well as how far we still have to go. The resulting timeline shows that women consistently make the story worthy of top-selling biographies and textbooks; someone just needs to write about them.

Scroll on to find out when women in the United States and around the world won rights, the names of the women who broke the glass ceiling, and the women from which country came together to end a civil war.


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Death Watch: Supreme Court stops execution of John Henry Ramirez over religious freedom appeal http://gurugama.org/death-watch-supreme-court-stops-execution-of-john-henry-ramirez-over-religious-freedom-appeal/ Thu, 23 Sep 2021 05:00:26 +0000 http://gurugama.org/death-watch-supreme-court-stops-execution-of-john-henry-ramirez-over-religious-freedom-appeal/ John Henry Ramirez was ready to be put to death on September 8 for the murder of a Corpus Christi convenience store clerk Pablo Castro in 2004. The parish priest of Ramirez Dana moore and members of his family – as well as Castro’s children – gathered at the Huntsville Unit north of Houston, while […]]]>

John Henry Ramirez was ready to be put to death on September 8 for the murder of a Corpus Christi convenience store clerk Pablo Castro in 2004. The parish priest of Ramirez Dana moore and members of his family – as well as Castro’s children – gathered at the Huntsville Unit north of Houston, while waiting for the 37-year-old to be taken to the state execution chamber at 6 p.m. At the time, however, the Supreme Court of the United States was still considering Ramirez’s appeal that prison authorities denied him the right to free exercise of religion by refusing to let Moore touch him and pray with him as he died from a lethal injection. It wasn’t until 9 p.m. that the news broke: the court suspended Ramirez’s execution and scheduled oral pleadings in his case for November 1.

Central to these arguments is an inmate’s right to spiritual counselor at the time of execution, particularly the extent of help counselors can and cannot administer. “This may be the fastest case in Supreme Court history because the issue is of national importance,” Ramirez’s lawyer said. Seth kretzer, noting that the October 27 execution of a Texas inmate Ruben Gutierrez was arrested for similar religious freedom issues. “SCOTUS must tell federal trial courts what the rules of the road are.”

The TDCJ decided that Spiritual Advisors could enter the room but that they would not be allowed to stand quietly in a corner – like a potted plant, as Seth Kretzer describes.

The Texas Department of Criminal Justicethe policy on spiritual counselors’ access to the execution chamber has fluctuated as inmates have filed religious freedom appeals in recent years. The department’s long-standing policy was to allow counselors inside the chamber as long as they were the TDCJ’s own chaplains – all but one were Christians. In 2019, the TDCJ excluded spiritual advisers of all faiths from the chamber after the Supreme Court suspended the execution of a Texas death row inmate whose request for a Buddhist spiritual advisor was rejected by prison authorities. . Then, in a sharp turnaround in April, the TDCJ ruled that the spiritual advisers chosen by the prisoners and controlled by the state could enter the chamber, but they would only be allowed to stand silently in a corner – like a plant. pot, as Kretzer describes.

Ramirez requests that his pastor be allowed to lay his hands on him and pray aloud as he dies. TDCJ argued that such actions pose a security risk – how, that’s not saying. But earlier this month, the District Judge David hittner ruled in favor of the department, writing that it had a compelling interest in maintaining “orderly, safe and efficient” executions.

Kretzer appealed, calling Hittner’s decision a “spiritual gag order” and asking how a pastor praying aloud can compromise security, given that counselors are subject to background checks and carefully vetted before they go. ” be admitted to the prison. The Attorney General’s Office, representing TDCJ, appeared to characterize the ministry’s policy as being more about convenience than security. “Where a Protestant may ask his pastor’s hands on him as he passes, a Muslim may prefer that his body be washed and wrapped immediately after his death, and a Buddhist that his body not be touched for seven days afterwards. his death “, wrote Assistant AG Jennifer wren morris.

“You have to ask politely, what about? Kretzer responded in a later dossier. “Washing and wrapping a body and not touching a body for a respectful period does not seem unduly painful.” – Brant Bingamon

A version of this article appeared in print on September 24, 2021 with the title: Death Watch: last minute reprieve for John Henry Ramirez


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Will artificial intelligence replace human authors in the near future? – The New Indian Express http://gurugama.org/will-artificial-intelligence-replace-human-authors-in-the-near-future-the-new-indian-express/ Wed, 22 Sep 2021 19:00:00 +0000 http://gurugama.org/will-artificial-intelligence-replace-human-authors-in-the-near-future-the-new-indian-express/ About a year ago the British newspaper The Guardian published an article titled A robot wrote this whole article. Are you still afraid, human ?, written by an artificial intelligence (AI) robot called GPT-3 (Generative Pre-trained Transformer 3). It is an autoregressive language model that uses deep learning to produce human-like text. GPT-3 was given […]]]>

About a year ago the British newspaper The Guardian published an article titled A robot wrote this whole article. Are you still afraid, human ?, written by an artificial intelligence (AI) robot called GPT-3 (Generative Pre-trained Transformer 3). It is an autoregressive language model that uses deep learning to produce human-like text. GPT-3 was given a brief introduction and tasked with writing an editorial of around 500 words in plain language, focusing on why humans have nothing to fear from AI. In response, he produced eight different essays. The Guardian picked the best parts of each and ran the edited part. GPT-3 even quoted Mahatma Gandhi in his article.

A rapid revolution in AI and natural language processing (NLP) is underway. While the world’s very first novel written by AI was released in Russia in 2008, the first full-length Korean novel, written by an AI named “Birampung,” was released in August. Birampung refers to a violent storm that strikes at the beginning and end of the creation of the universe. The 560-page novel was “made” by novelist and mathematician Kim Tae-yon. Kim was reluctant to share details of the technology involved. But 1,000 books were loaded into Birampung’s operating system and it was equipped with the most advanced deep autonomous learning algorithm. Like a real director, Kim chose the script, the background and the characters, but the writing process and composition was done by Birampung. The novel, whose name was translated into English by The world from now on, lasted for seven years and consists of five stories in which the protagonists – a disabled amateur mathematician, a math teacher and entrepreneur, a psychiatrist, an astrophysicist and a Buddhist monk – were drawn to each other in their individual quests to understand the meaning of human existence.

Is there an existential threat to writers now? Consider GPT-3, the third-generation language prediction model in the series created by OpenAI, an artificial intelligence research company founded among others by Tesla billionaire Elon Musk. What exactly is going on in GPT-3? a MIT Technology Review article said: “What it seems to be good is the text synthesis that it has found elsewhere on the internet, making it sort of like a vast eclectic album created from millions upon millions of excerpts. of text that he then sticks in a strange and wonderful way.
on demand.”

GPT-3 can also produce pastiches of particular writers. For example, when given the title, author’s name and the initial word “It”, the AI ​​produced a short story titled The importance of being on Twitter, written in the style of Jerome K Jerome. He even wrote a reasonably informative article on GPT-3.

“Playing with GPT-3 is like seeing the future” is what some experts think. However, AIs have many shortcomings. Their language is not always polite. And a lot of people noticed a lack of depth, as the text read more like cut and paste work. Some experts felt that the GPT-3 program only matches words and phrases based on statistical correlations between those in its database. In a March 2021 article published in the journal Nature, Matthew Hutson discusses the rise and risks of language-generating AI. Hutson believes that great AI can write like humans, but it still lacks the common sense to understand how the world works, both physically and socially. For example, when asked, “How many rainbows does it take to jump from Hawaii to seventeen?” GPT-3 replied, “It takes two rainbows to jump from Hawaii to seventeen.”

In The Guardian piece, GPT-3 wrote, “I’m just a bunch of code, governed by lines of code that encompass my mission statement.” GPT-3 had been formed in about 200 billion words, at an estimated cost of tens of millions of dollars. AI therefore always needs a human editor to link its writings to reality. In fact, within days of posting the editorial written by GPT-3, a follow-up letter titled A human wrote this article. You shouldn’t be afraid of GPT-3 was published in The Guardian. The author, Albert Fox Cahn, argued that while GPT-3 is “quite impressive … it is useless without human intervention and modifications”. “GPT-3 is just the latest example of computer-aided fatherhood, the process by which human authors use technology to improve the writing process,” wrote Cahn. American poet-programmer Allison Parrish also noted: “Assign (The Guardian article) to AI is a bit like attributing the pyramids to the Pharaoh. Pharaoh did not do this. The workers did.

GPT-3 is an artificial neural network with over 175 billion parameters that uses only 0.12% of its cognitive capacity. This is certainly a big step up from GPT-2 which had 1.5 billion settings. When GPT-4 or GPT-5 arrives in the future, should human writers really be afraid? Will the AI ​​live up to JK Rowling or Kazuo Ishiguro, or will it report on Afghanistan? In his Nature paper, Hutson wrote, “It’s possible that a larger model would do better, with more parameters, more training data, more time to learn. But it will become more and more expensive and cannot continue indefinitely. Another limitation is the opaque complexity of language models. Still, would a GPT-n or equivalent AI be able to produce a Tagore song or a Shakespeare play in the near future? A new technological angst would invariably evolve around it, however.

PS: This article was written entirely by a human being, not an AI.

Atanu Biswas
Professor of Statistics, Indian Statistical Institute, Kolkata
(appubabale@gmail.com


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How Satya Hinduja plays with different sounds to create meaningful, transformative and healing music http://gurugama.org/how-satya-hinduja-plays-with-different-sounds-to-create-meaningful-transformative-and-healing-music/ Wed, 22 Sep 2021 00:42:35 +0000 http://gurugama.org/how-satya-hinduja-plays-with-different-sounds-to-create-meaningful-transformative-and-healing-music/ Born into a family that loved music, Satya HindujaThe initiation of began at a very young age. It was the only thing, she said, that attracted him. Cousins ​​often remembered playing jingles on the television by ear, and soon she began to take classical and semi-classical music lessons. Invited to sing on All India Radio […]]]>

Born into a family that loved music, Satya HindujaThe initiation of began at a very young age. It was the only thing, she said, that attracted him. Cousins ​​often remembered playing jingles on the television by ear, and soon she began to take classical and semi-classical music lessons.

Invited to sing on All India Radio (AIR) from a young age, her natural musical talent guided her every step of the way. Often traveling to London and Switzerland to visit her uncles, she was exposed to world music. When MTV was launched in India (she was 13), it further broadened her musical vision.

Industrialist Ashok Hinduja’s daughter says that while her early years of schooling provided her with very little musical training, she found a tutor, Bismarck, who would guide her musical energies in the right direction.

“He taught me the guitar while his daughter taught me the piano. Before finding it, I was going to different music teachers and I was disappointed. Meeting Bismarck brought about a complete change in the life experience. He told me about Berklee College of Music, and I knew then, before I finished grade 10, that I had to go, ”she recalls.

In between, she says multiple personal and environmental trauma caused her music to stop. But she persevered – because she knew her life was empty without music.

Exposed to trauma and music

The day she entered Berklee was also September 11. “I was suddenly exposed to global trauma. It was one of the bigger ones because one of the flights had taken off from the Boston airport, ”she said.

Satya says it was chaos and chaos because classes didn’t go the way they should have for the first three months. Leaving a safety net at home and moving to a faraway land, then being sucked into trauma like 9/11 was heartbreaking.

But over time Satya began to play many classical guitars and compose with the instrument. She admits it was a huge culture shock, going from an “intimate experience with music” to a plethora of possibilities – music technology, jazz music theory, traditional music theory, songwriting and music therapy.

“As an independent thinker following my trajectory, when I entered Berklee I was in the category of students starting at the grassroots level. There were students younger than me who wrote symphony orchestras while I was still learning to write a note because India is so different from the United States when it comes to school. Americans learn a lot about music during their formative years, ”she says.

Soon, she will engage in songwriting, switch to film music, and merge electronic music with different world music and film soundtracks.

Explore different realms

Satya returned to India and started working in the film industry with music directors Salim-Suleiman for six and a half years.

But as a musician constantly evolving with music, she wanted to explore more. She has collaborated with mixed media artists and entered the enjoyable arts space. She also tried her hand at DJing, making her trip “a story of energy rather than music as a subject “.

In this process, she was invited to speak at Ink Talks in 2013, before which she obtained a Masters in Electronic Music Production in Dubspot (NY).

“My talk focused on the impact of different sound frequencies on us. I played the sound of a siren against the sound of the ocean. I started talking about how naturally when we are in a city like Bombay noise pollution impacts our brains on a very subconscious level that we don’t even know because we are used to the cacophony of noise. noises compared to when we move in a completely natural environment. ,” she says.

She met a neuroscientist from San Francisco at the conference that would change her life and music forever.

Satya explains, “He was talking about his journey in meditation music and trying to find his life path. He decided to go to the Himalayas to test the brain waves of meditating monks. I was intrigued and asked him how we could work together.

“He offered me a frequency of 136.10 sound cycles per second, for the heart chakra, and it was the birth of alchemical sound environments,” she adds.

Satya used the frequency as a fundamental drone in Indian classical music and composed around it. The effect was life changing.

“I wasted time and space for three hours. I lost consciousness of cognitive mind, thinking mind, monkey mind as I was still, looking out the window, even though I didn’t know I was being caught in a deep meditative state for the first time in my life. It was pretty exciting, scary, revealing and everything in between. “

Before that, a question that persisted during Satya’s research revealed the Hindu metaphysical concept of Nada Brahma (the primitive sound of being). She then began to incorporate the symbolism of ancient wisdom and yoga sutras into her minimalist and experimental music. She discovered the interconnectivity between neuro-linguistic programming, kinesiology, quantum theory and Vedic philosophy.

Deep listening experience

Alchemical sound environment [ASE], put simply, is a multi-sensory deep listening experience designed to invoke states of reflection, receptivity, and exchange.

“I decided to put it in a different genre so that people can access it. If you start telling people it’s a healing sound; there may be objections because it is not yet proven. So I decided on the name of the current compositions, Alchemic Electronica. I quickly merged electro with Buddhist chants, western instruments and tuned it in depth to also match the frequency range of the planet so people could engage in it, ”says- she.

Alchemical sound environments, says Satya, have a broader vision. She took it to Oxford, a summit in Dubai, and first introduced people to the experience, then built an ecosystem to normalize it.

After COVID hit, we started to find resonating similarities with mental health projects. In May of this year, we led a special three-hour segment, “Spotlight India”, from the Hinduja Foundation at the Global Never Alone Summit 2021 which kicked off a global conversation on mental health.

Through “Spotlight India”, the Hinduja Foundation wanted to offer the Indian public (and beyond) positive coping strategies to help them move from trauma and stigma to inspiration and action.

“We aim to build the alchemical sound environments in the field of early childhood development, its impact on the brain and body, and how we can merge new healing techniques with wisdom, ancient practices and emerging technologies.” , she explains.


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Leonard Cohen’s rules for living well http://gurugama.org/leonard-cohens-rules-for-living-well/ Tue, 21 Sep 2021 13:00:24 +0000 http://gurugama.org/leonard-cohens-rules-for-living-well/ “Act as you would like to be and soon you will be as you act.” – Leonard Cohen. For some reason, it’s a pretty comical motive to imagine Leonard Cohen playing tennis, but when he fled to a Buddhist monastery, that’s exactly what the monks sent him to do. . Their goal was to make […]]]>

“Act as you would like to be and soon you will be as you act.” – Leonard Cohen.

For some reason, it’s a pretty comical motive to imagine Leonard Cohen playing tennis, but when he fled to a Buddhist monastery, that’s exactly what the monks sent him to do. . Their goal was to make him take life a little less seriously. He had been informed that he “knew how to work but not how to play”. All of this led Cohen to celebrate the mantra he continued to extol long after hanging up his racket: “Lighten up!” This is what enlightenment means, to enlighten.

His songs may appear to have been written by a man of a thousand lives, and in a way, he had a wealth of wisdom that made such a comic book feat possible. So, we’ve put together various comments on mindfulness, fulfillment, and just how to live well in general that the wily Leonard Cohen served alongside his singing tower. He was the first to admit that he was far from perfect, so these nuggets of advice don’t come from a deity who is holier than you, and what’s more, Cohen would also concede that the old line “he it is better to learn from other lessons than yours ”, reads better than played; nonetheless, his hard-earned insight is a boon to brighten up our daily lives.

On his birthday, we not only say thank you for Leonard Cohen’s songs but also thank you for the balm of your sagacious lyrics. From the sane to the sincere, please enjoy the words of the man himself below, looking at the central tenets of his art and the things he said about them far from six strings or the album.

Leonard Cohen’s rules of good living:

At the discretion of creativity …

While Cohen’s catalog may not have compared to the optimistic realm of chic, his funeral chants were a means of seeking salvation from the suffering that had engendered them. Alas, not all of his songs were cut out of the oppressed fabric, so he quickly disowned the idea when told that good work comes from suffering itself.

In an interview during his time as a Buddhist monk, he remarked: “It is a popular notion that it is exclusively suffering that produces good work or insightful work, I don’t think it does. . I think in a way it’s a trigger or a lever, but I think good work is done despite suffering, like a victory over suffering.

He went even further in 1976 when he told the Guardian: “A cry of pain in itself is just that. It can affect you or you can turn away from it. But a work which deals with the experience which produced the cry of pain is quite another matter. The cry is transformed, alchimized, by the work by a certain objectivity which does not abandon the emotion but gives it form. It is the difference between life and art.

In the face of mortality …

We all have to deal with mortality to some extent, but with Leonard Cohen’s long battle with illness, he’s had time to watch it and turn the confrontation into song. His album You want it darker saw him stare at the subject without flinching and kill it with golden prose.

Talk with PBS in his later years he said, “We are all dying from this incurable disease called age. Of course you can feel it. My friend Irvine Leighton, Canada’s greatest poet, once said that it is “the inevitable disappointment of growing old”. But later, in the face of death, he said The New Yorker: “In a sense, this particular situation is filled with a lot less distractions than at other times in my life and it actually allows me to work with a bit more focus and continuity.”

Adding, “You are dying but you don’t have to cooperate so enthusiastically with the process. It’s very compassionate at this point. I mean, more than at any time in my life, I don’t have that voice that says “you’re fucking shit”. It is a huge blessing.

To be a scholar …

Leonard Cohen was an extremely open-minded person. He sought to see the value of most things and apparently weighed everything up. All of these adventures, for lack of a better word, seemed to be underpinned by an almost studious view of what one can learn from experiences and as such he took a scholarly approach to life and the arts.

In this regard, he remarked with humor: “I am an old scholar, more handsome now than when I was young. That’s what sitting on your ass does to your face. And sitting down, he spilled over just about everything, explaining, “Every time I pick up a magazine, I read writing that stands out. My pace and my perspective are continually influenced by the things I encounter. You recapitulate all the movement of your own culture.

Adding: “Sometimes we are touched by certain elaborate languages, like the language we associate with the Elizabethan period, with the King James translation of the Bible, or Shakespeare. There are times when you are influenced by very simple things. The instructions on a packet of cereal have magnificent clarity. You are touched by the writing of National Geographic – it represents a certain kind of accomplishment.

Before concluding: “Sometimes you go to another phase where you are touched by the writing of the demented or the mentally ill. I receive a lot of letters from these kinds of writers. You begin to see it as the most precise reflection of your own reality, the landscape on which you operate. There are many types of expression that I am sensitive to.

On love…

It would seem from albums like Songs of love and hate, that Cohen spent much of his time reflecting on the ways of love. In fact, he is the central protagonist of his life’s work. Despite this, he said he was not an authority on the matter, joking: “My reputation as a ladies’ man was a joke that made me laugh bitterly during the ten thousand nights I spent. single.”

From the outside this certainly doesn’t appear to be the case and as such he’s a pretty reliable source on the subject. And of all the open love letters he’s touted, this is the next piece of Poems and songs it seems important to him, and it is the humble question of accepting the condition for what it is: “We are not crazy. We are human. We want to love, and someone must forgive us for the paths we take to love, for the paths are many and dark, and we are fiery and cruel in our journey.

And like he said the Guardian in 2009: “It is the most difficult activity in which humans engage, it is love. You know, we have the feeling that we can’t live without love, that life has very little meaning without it.

On the fight against depression …

Throughout his life, Cohen faced depression like many people do. His message of hope to move away from it is a balm of hope for those who suffer or for all those who have been depressed elsewhere. “When I talk about depression I am talking about clinical depression which is the basis of your whole life, a background of dread and anxiety, a feeling that nothing is going well, that pleasure is not available and may all your strategies collapse, “he said.

But I concluded with joy: “I am happy to report that, by imperceptible degrees and by the grace of good teachers and luck, this depression slowly dissolved and never returned with the same ferocity. which has prevailed for most of my life. “

Whether you should listen to his advice anyway …

Listen to the hummingbird
Whose wings you can’t see
Listen to the hummingbird
Don’t listen to me

Listen to the butterfly
Whose days but number three
Listen to the butterfly
Don’t listen to me

Hear the mind of God
What doesn’t have to be
Hear the mind of God
Don’t listen to me

Listen to the hummingbird
Whose wings you can’t see
Listen to the hummingbird
Don’t listen to me

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Insights into the “lost tribe” Jewish communities in India and Myanmar http://gurugama.org/insights-into-the-lost-tribe-jewish-communities-in-india-and-myanmar/ Mon, 20 Sep 2021 09:00:20 +0000 http://gurugama.org/insights-into-the-lost-tribe-jewish-communities-in-india-and-myanmar/ In 2017, while traveling in India, a friend from the northeastern state of Assam told me about the lost tribe Jewish communities in neighboring Mizoram state. Growing up in a Jewish family without ever fully embracing the religion of my practicing parents, I was intrigued and wanted to know more. The Jews of the Lost […]]]>

In 2017, while traveling in India, a friend from the northeastern state of Assam told me about the lost tribe Jewish communities in neighboring Mizoram state. Growing up in a Jewish family without ever fully embracing the religion of my practicing parents, I was intrigued and wanted to know more.

The Jews of the Lost Tribes, I soon learned, believe they are descended from the 10 tribes of Israel that were exiled from the ancient kingdom of Israel by the Assyrians around the 8th century BC I photograph their rituals and their daily life.

A few weeks later, I arrived in Aizawl, a town built on top of densely forested hills. I called a contact from one of the local congregations and set up a meeting. When two representatives arrived at my hostel, I explained my interest in their community and my wish to photograph their religious services and rituals. They seemed open to the idea but did not commit; they should talk to the other members before telling me their decision. The next morning they called and said that one of the worshipers had passed away and invited me to photograph the funeral.

After the funeral, members of Shalom Tzion Synagogue welcomed me to their community with an enthusiasm that I had never encountered before in any of my documentary projects – and neither have I since. They had only limited contact with other Jews and had never met a photographer interested in their community before. There was a mutual curiosity between us and I found myself answering many questions they had about my upbringing and life in Israel, where I had worked for several years as a photographer and journalist.

One of the members of the Aizawl congregation was from Chin State in western Myanmar. He told me about a small group of Jews from the lost tribe in Kalay, a small town in the Sagaing region of his homeland. After my stay in Aizawl, I decided to find myself there.

After a grueling series of bus rides lasting over 24 hours, I arrived in Kalay – a flat tropical town surrounded by vast farmland – and was greeted by a few members of the Lost Tribe. I was sleep deprived and dizzy from the trip, but they informed me that the whole community was anxiously awaiting my arrival at their synagogue. We went by motorbike.

The temple, just outside the city, was a two-story wooden building with thatched bamboo walls and a tin roof, surrounded by fields. Inside, I met the 20 or so community members who quickly asked me to deliver a speech which, after spending time with the Lost Tribe communities in Mizoram and responding to similar requests, n wasn’t entirely unexpected.

I managed to put a few words together in my haggard state and then was treated to a delicious meal that had been prepared by the community in the backyard of the temple.

The community there – which dates back to the 1980s when a group of Christians converted to Judaism – was more isolated than those I had come to know in India. They had never met a foreigner before, they said, let alone someone who was both Jewish and interested in photographing their community. And yet, again, I felt a mutual curiosity and had intimate access to their lives.

Jews from the lost tribe of northeast India and northwest Myanmar are a small minority, numbering less than 10,000, by some estimates. They easily miss the Christian and Buddhist populations of the region.

Many communities of the lost tribe of northern India formed in the 1950s. British missionaries had converted most of the local population to Christianity, and some of the converts saw ritual connections to their ancient practices. and those of the ancient Jews whom they had heard of in the Old Testament.

Eventually, the belief that their ancestors were a tribe of Israelites in exile began to spread.

In the 1970s, thousands of people from the Shinlung tribe of northeastern India began to adopt the practices and rituals of the Jewish faith. With the help of Eliyahu Avichail, a rabbi who traveled the world in search of lost tribe communities, some began to settle in Israel – not without facing the skepticism of Israelis who questioned their motivations, their sincerity and their historical links with Judaism.

Rabbi Avichail named the group Bnei Menashe, meaning Son of Manasseh, who was one of the 10 lost tribes.

The Jews I met in Aizawl told me that they face some discrimination in India. It is difficult for them, for example, to find a job that allows them time off to observe the Jewish Sabbath and other holidays. Many of the Lost Tribe have said they no longer feel out of place in their homelands. Almost all of them have expressed a desire to make their alyah – to immigrate to Israel, the land they believe to be their true homeland, as God has promised them.

Over the past 30 years, thousands of members of the lost tribe communities of northeast India have moved to Israel – in part because in 2005 the Bnei Menashe were officially declared descendants of the tribe d origin of Manasseh.

Initially, I was interested in how the Jews of the Lost Tribe were redefining what it means to be Jewish – by asserting their faith and gaining acceptance by the Israeli government. The existence of these communities complicates notions of Jewish identity while emphasizing its malleability.

But as I spent time photographing and talking with members of the Lost Tribes, I was moved by the sincerity with which they brought the Jewish faith into their lives.

And lately, I find myself remembering the morning I spent photographing Shabbat services at the Kalay Temple – and how the Hebrew prayers of the congregation mingled with the sounds of church bells and Buddhist chants ringing in the hall. far.

Daniel tepper is a New York-based photojournalist. You can follow his work on Instagram.



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Real-time accounts of archaeological finds http://gurugama.org/real-time-accounts-of-archaeological-finds/ Mon, 20 Sep 2021 06:18:30 +0000 http://gurugama.org/real-time-accounts-of-archaeological-finds/ Extracted with permission from The First Archaeologist of the Indian World: Letters from Alexander Cunningham to JDM Beglar by Upinder Singh. Considering the huge area to be covered and the limited manpower, the expeditions were diligently planned based on careful assessments of the areas likely to yield the most valuable results. Archaeologists did not blindly […]]]>

Extracted with permission from The First Archaeologist of the Indian World: Letters from Alexander Cunningham to JDM Beglar by Upinder Singh.


Considering the huge area to be covered and the limited manpower, the expeditions were diligently planned based on careful assessments of the areas likely to yield the most valuable results. Archaeologists did not blindly follow in the footsteps of Chinese monks Faxian and Xuanzang, as is often imagined. Xuanzang’s account was, of course, important for some sites, for example, Bodh Gaya. Both monks are mentioned in Rajgir’s discussion, but with reference to the location of the Sattapani cave, Cunningham remarked that “the curiously absurd descriptions of the Chinese pilgrims leave us without any really precise information.” He was therefore neither incredulous nor devoid of critical thinking.

The routes and routes have been carefully developed based on the gaps in existing documentation and areas of maximum potential. The beggar’s roads [J. D. M. Beglar was Cunningham’s Archaeological Assistant] have been specially designed to take it to places requiring photographic documentation. Cunningham determined where they might meet on their tours in order to confer and collaborate. Several letters speak of the need for detailed maps of known and unknown areas, and the importance of including maps in archaeological survey reports. But judging by the way Cunningham detailed locations, routes, and distances, it’s obvious he had plenty of maps on his mind.

As the two men traveled a lot, they had to anticipate each other’s movements and do calculations before deciding on the addresses to which they should send their letters. Different modes of transfer are mentioned: land mail, packet mail, Bangly, Bangly Dak, registered mail, Tongha Dak and ox train. Sometimes letters arrived at their destination after the addressee had left; sometimes they got lost in transit. The telegraph is mentioned for the first time at the beginning of 1877 and the references increase thereafter.

Upinder Singh


The First Archaeologist of the Indian World: Letters from Alexander Cunningham to JDM Beglar


Oxford University Press, 2021

The most remarkable thing about the letters is that they describe archaeological finds – many of major historical significance – as they were made, in real time. They give direct access to first impressions of the sites, to ruminations on their reach, to breakthroughs. Writing in the fall of 1875, he announced:

“I have proof that Pâṭaliputra was on the Son! This is why the Son was the Erannoboas of the Greeks, as I have always told you. (Letter n ° 43)

To Rajgir in December 1875:

“I spent 3 days in Râjgir – where I discovered several new caves – two of which are close to our so-called Sattapanni cave… my men first reached your cave from above -! Right above there are two real caves over 70 feet long each, but they have only ever been inhabited by bears. (Letter n ° 52)

In Mathura, in March 1882:

“I only found one sculpture of any value. It is, however, a very precious element: a group of Heracles killing the Nemean lion! I have the sculpture with me now. It is over 3 feet tall – I found it forming the side of an ox water trough and covered with a bit of brick wall and mud. Before recognizing the subject, I noticed the artistic merit of the sculpture. I intend to have it photographed in Simla by Craddock. (Letter # 155)

In a letter, Cunningham wrote about the findings of the Buddhist stupa and Gandhakuti (temple) in Shravasti, in another on the discovery in Sankissa of the pedestal of the elephant capital Ashokan. Sultanganj’s discoveries in 1880 unfold over several letters written in March and April 1880. Initially, Beglar found nothing; then he discovered a stupa, and later relics inside the stupa. Cunningham was excited and told him to send him the relics: “I wish to see them and draw them.” The high priest of Ceylon wanted the bone relic.

“I suppose he will call it a relic of Buddha and make the people of Ceylon bow!” (Letter # 167)

The letters transport the reader to the bustle of archaeological expeditions. Cunningham often traveled on horseback or elephant back. The elephant, the camels and the servants had to be sent in advance. Packing, weighing and loading the baggage into the train’s baggage car was a major operation. Sometimes the luggage arrived at the site long after Cunningham had reached; sometimes he realized too late that he forgot to pack an important item, for example paper. There are references to “khalassies” and to the servants of the entourage. Locating and hiring camels was a persistent problem; the camel drivers were unreliable and there was endless haggling over prices. References to the railway begin in 1874, but mention of camels and elephants continues. There were other modes of transport such as ox-trains, horse-drawn carriages, carts, tongas, horse-drawn carriages and phaetons. In October 1875, Carlleyle [Cunninghm’s second Archaeological Assistant] was thrown from his dog cart (apparently this had happened several times), causing a serious and permanent injury to his arm.

Apart from land travel, long and arduous journeys sometimes involved river crossings.

“The Sound is full of water and the crossing is difficult and very tedious due to subsidence and breakage of parts of the roadway. My elephant waded across the river, and so did my camels, without their loads. (Letter n ° 50)

There have been occasional accidents. Writing from Shekohabad in February 1877, Cunningham reported:

“All my books in boxes 3 and 4 are destroyed – The camel sat with them in the middle of the Ahsin river – and almost killed my cook too.” (Letter n ° 78)

There have been encounters with elephants and leopards. Sometimes there was death on the march. In January 1882, a member of the team named Gohar Khan suddenly fell ill and died.

The expeditions required the purchase of equipment such as ropes and stakes; organization of tents; and collect provisions and food such as bread, meat, butter, and tea for the camp. Writing from Sankargarh on December 18, 1874 and discussing where they might meet, Cunningham told Beglar that they should change base to Uchera, “where the water is good, the provisions are plentiful – and there has both a station and a post office “(Letter n ° 23). There were the expected occupational risks. In February 1875 he wrote from Bhilsa,

“Here I am in front of the Dâk bungalow, which has a broken roof, and which is also full of wasps. (Letter n ° 34)

The weather is a regular refrain.

“Furious wind — 3 weeks before its time.” I waded the Son easily, up to my knees only. (Letter # 139)

It is the heat that is most often mentioned:

“The heat came suddenly at the end of February. I managed to continue until I got to Uchera… I went to Allahabad by train and was devoured by mosquitoes [sic ] while waiting for money. (Letter n ° 36)

Cunningham found the heat debilitating and exhausting. Calcutta was too hot for him. In February 1882, he told Beglar that he found the heat of Calcutta unbearable: “I am melting very quickly now. I will be very happy to come out of this Purgatory ”(Letter n ° 154). Whenever possible, he retreated to the cool climates of Simla …

Money and accounts work like regular threads through letters. Cunningham sent frequent calls to his assistants for bills, vouchers, and receipts, and urged them to be careful with money. Bureaucratic errors and delays were sources of exasperation, as were the stubbornness of the Comptroller General and the ineffectiveness of the “Red Treasury Tapists”. The money was sent to archaeologists in the field in cash, money order, or check. Beglar often ran out of money and wrote for more; sometimes there weren’t any. Besides the money needed for official archaeological work, Beglar had personal financial problems. He wanted a raise, otherwise he was looking for a better paying job….

Apart from the weather, money and accounting, what emerges from the letters is how the archaeological work was carried out amid frequent illnesses. Beglar was a sick man, prone to fever and headaches, and Cunningham regularly inquired about his health … Advice is frequent.

“I’m afraid you’ve been in the sun too much. You should have greater respect for the power of the sun and always have pills on hand to cool the system, as well as quinine to prevent fever. I remember you exposed yourself bareheaded to the Sun in Bharhut in the most daring way, enough to anger Sûrya. (Letter n ° 57)

… In fact, several letters reveal that during the most productive years of his life, Cunningham suffered from debilitating physical illnesses. In June 1878 he had a lot to write, but had neither the time nor the capacity because he was “paralyzed with rheumatism”. He had back pain and could not sit up painlessly; he planned to treat it with applications of hot water followed by rubbing with camphor and brandy… On April 26, 1880, he wrote:

“My knee is getting stronger, but it’s a slow process. I can sleep on my right side and move around with just one crutch, so I’m fairly independent. But I have a nasty attack of diarrhea, which worries me. I’ll get to work on Hwen Thsang for you despite all the discomforts. (Letter n ° 127)

The discoveries Beglar made at Mahabodhi in 1881 greatly excited Cunningham and he was eager to see them for himself.

“Your discoveries in the interior are very curious; and I only wish I could climb to see the inside. But my right angle [ sic ] has been swelling a lot lately – and is now bandaged – and I’m pretty lame. (Letter # 146)

The punitive routine also led to exhaustion, especially as he grew older. This did not, however, tarnish his keen sense of purpose or his enthusiasm for his work.


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